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Place   Listen
noun
Place  n.  
1.
Any portion of space regarded as measured off or distinct from all other space, or appropriated to some definite object or use; position; ground; site; spot; rarely, unbounded space. "Here is the place appointed." "What place can be for us Within heaven's bound?" "The word place has sometimes a more confused sense, and stands for that space which any body takes up; and so the universe is a place."
2.
A broad way in a city; an open space; an area; a court or short part of a street open only at one end. "Hangman boys in the market place."
3.
A position which is occupied and held; a dwelling; a mansion; a village, town, or city; a fortified town or post; a stronghold; a region or country. "Are you native of this place?"
4.
Rank; degree; grade; order of priority, advancement, dignity, or importance; especially, social rank or position; condition; also, official station; occupation; calling. "The enervating magic of place." "Men in great place are thrice servants." "I know my place as I would they should do theirs."
5.
Vacated or relinquished space; room; stead (the departure or removal of another being or thing being implied). "In place of Lord Bassanio."
6.
A definite position or passage of a document. "The place of the scripture which he read was this."
7.
Ordinal relation; position in the order of proceeding; as, he said in the first place.
8.
Reception; effect; implying the making room for. "My word hath no place in you."
9.
(Astron.) Position in the heavens, as of a heavenly body; usually defined by its right ascension and declination, or by its latitude and longitude.
10.
(Racing) The position of first, second, or third at the finish, esp. the second position. In betting, to win a bet on a horse for place it must, in the United States, finish first or second, in England, usually, first, second, or third.
Place of arms (Mil.), a place calculated for the rendezvous of men in arms, etc., as a fort which affords a safe retreat for hospitals, magazines, etc.
High place (Script.), a mount on which sacrifices were offered. "Him that offereth in the high place."
In place, in proper position; timely.
Out of place, inappropriate; ill-timed; as, his remarks were out of place.
Place kick (Football), the act of kicking the ball after it has been placed on the ground.
Place name, the name of a place or locality.
To give place, to make room; to yield; to give way; to give advantage. "Neither give place to the devil." "Let all the rest give place."
To have place, to have a station, room, or seat; as, such desires can have no place in a good heart.
To take place.
(a)
To come to pass; to occur; as, the ceremony will not take place.
(b)
To take precedence or priority.
(c)
To take effect; to prevail. "If your doctrine takes place." "But none of these excuses would take place."
To take the place of, to be substituted for.
Synonyms: Situation; seat; abode; position; locality; location; site; spot; office; employment; charge; function; trust; ground; room; stead.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Place" Quotes from Famous Books



... E. C. Bentley and Lucian Oldershaw all claim to have made the momentous introduction, Mr. Eccles adding that it took place at the office of the Speaker, while Gilbert himself has described the meeting twice: once in the street, once in a restaurant. Belloc remembers the introduction as made in the year 1900 by Lucian Oldershaw, who was living at the ...
— Gilbert Keith Chesterton • Maisie Ward

... then to Devereux Court, and I resolved to forego all hope—all persecution—of Isora! My brother—my brother, my heart yearns to you at this moment, even though years and distance, and, above all, my own crimes, place a gulf between us which I may never pass; it yearns to you when I think of those quiet shades, and the scenes where, pure and unsullied, we wandered together, when life was all verdure and freshness, and we dreamed not of what was to come! If even ...
— Devereux, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... up in the bow on a rather uncomfortable cushion of anchor and roding, caught glimpses of the receding shore over the crests behind. One minute he looked down into the face of Burgess, holding the steering oar in place, the next the stern was high above him and he felt that he was reclining on the back of his neck. But always the shoulders of the rowers moved steadily in the short, deep strokes of the rough water oarsman, and the beach, with the white light and red-roofed house ...
— Keziah Coffin • Joseph C. Lincoln

... The circling dances of the 8th of July effaced the enthusiasms of the 20th of March. The Corsican became the antithesis of the Bearnese. The flag on the dome of the Tuileries was white. The exile reigned. Hartwell's pine table took its place in front of the fleur-de-lys-strewn throne of Louis XIV. Bouvines and Fontenoy were mentioned as though they had taken place on the preceding day, Austerlitz having become antiquated. The altar and the throne fraternized majestically. ...
— Les Miserables - Complete in Five Volumes • Victor Hugo

... one knows what he does and what he doesn't do," Apollonie lamented, louder than ever. "The poor master is sick, and all his servant does is to stumble about the place, not asking after his needs and letting everything go to rack and ruin. Not a cabbage-head or a pea-plant is to be seen. Not one strawberry or raspberry, no golden apricots on the wall or a single little dainty peach. The disorder everywhere is frightful. When I think how wonderfully ...
— Maezli - A Story of the Swiss Valleys • Johanna Spyri

... and execution of criminals. Berkstead, Cobbet, and Okey, three regicides, had escaped beyond sea; and after wandering some time concealed in Germany, came privately to Delft, having appointed their families to meet them in that place. They were discovered by Downing, the king's resident in Holland, who had formerly served the protector and commonwealth in the same station, and who once had even been chaplain to Okey's regiment. He applied for a warrant to arrest them. It had been usual for the states ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.I., Part F. - From Charles II. to James II. • David Hume

... with their bread to win to do with the fashions of the idle people of the world? But even the mother did not object to following them when she found the wide, useless sleeves, so much sought after by foolish young girls, giving place to the small coat-sleeves which had been considered the thing in her own and her mother's youth. They were, as she said, far more sensible-like, and a saving besides. The additional width which Katie quietly appropriated to Shenac's skirt would have been declared a piece of sinful extravagance, ...
— Shenac's Work at Home • Margaret Murray Robertson

... going to enter a town or a stretch of country where Hunt Rennie was the big man, and claim to be Rennie's unknown son. Maybe later he could come to a decision about his action. But first he wanted to be sure. There might well be no place for a Drew Rennie in Hunt Rennie's present life. They were total strangers and perhaps it must ...
— Rebel Spurs • Andre Norton

... the sale of the canoe to the boatman by the river-front, and the ride to New York, were accomplished without accident or delay, and the girl finally found herself in the great city—the place of her dreams! ...
— The Girl Scouts' Good Turn • Edith Lavell

... fate he was indifferent. Somehow he believed that he was not destined to die in this horrible place, and prayed that at least he might see the girl once more before he fell a victim to the malice ...
— The Book of All-Power • Edgar Wallace

... your years on the altar of motherhood. At least I am thankful that Walter has decided to parade his affairs less, now that Evelyn is coming out. You proud, queenly, beautiful woman, how can you be so brave? In your place I should have died of hopelessness and grief years ago. But you go on with your precious head high in the air, smiling, though crushed by your agony. Day in and day out your nerves are taut—you never rest. Why hasn't something ...
— Letters of a Dakota Divorcee • Jane Burr

... the next best thing, however: he took a place in a sailing dahabeeah; and as we steamed up slowly, stopping often on the way, to give me time to write my articles, he managed to arrive almost always at every town or ruin exactly when ...
— Miss Cayley's Adventures • Grant Allen

... Court. The great local noble who had lorded it as he chose over the suitors of the Court for fifteen years, and fined and taxed and forfeited as seemed good to him, suddenly, without a moment's warning, saw his place filled by a stranger, a mere clerk trained in the Court among the royal servants, a simple nominee of the king; he could no longer doubt that the royal supremacy was now without rival, without limit, irresistible, complete. Such ...
— Henry the Second • Mrs. J. R. Green

... another till he come of age himself;" and he mentioned the Earl of Kent, who was waiting on Lord Bedford at table when a letter came to that lord announcing that the earldom had fallen to his servant the young lord; at which he rose from table and made him sit down in his place, taking ...
— How Britannia Came to Rule the Waves - Updated to 1900 • W.H.G. Kingston

... imparts, The gentle flame, the pleasing poignant pang, That Ovid formerly so sweetly sang. Some knowledge of good company he'd got; A charming voice and manner were his lot; And if we may disclose the mystick truth, 'Twas Cupid who preceptor made the youth. He with the brother solely took a place, That better he the sister's charms might trace; And under this disguise he fully gained What he desired, so well his part he feigned: An able master, or a lover true, To teach or sigh, whichever was in view, So thoroughly he ...
— The Tales and Novels, Complete • Jean de La Fontaine

... hereditary in Charles and his heirs male. In the summer of 1651 Christina was, with difficulty, persuaded to reconsider her resolution to abdicate, but three years later the nation had become convinced that her abdication was highly desirable, and the solemn act took place on the 6th of July 1654 at the castle of Upsala, in the presence of the estates and the great dignitaries of the realm. Many were the causes which predisposed her to what was, after all, anything but an act of self-renunciation. First of all she could not fail to remark the increasing ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 3 - "Chitral" to "Cincinnati" • Various

... the laws of good society. He was by no means an egotist, and seemed never at a loss for something to talk about. I led the conversation to the subject of his country, and he gave me an amusing description of it, talking of his fief-part of which was within the domains of the sultan-as a place where gaiety was unknown, and where the most determined ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... hurled into the dust! Already he had chosen a successor from among the princes of the blood, and when the time was ripe—when Rui, the high-priest of Amon, had passed the limits of life decreed by the gods to mortals and closed his eyes in death, he, Bai, would occupy his place, a new life for Egypt, and Moses and his race would ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... might have been an inch, a mile, Or thousands,—ten, for what I know; It seemed a pleasant place, for still a smile Was on my face; I ...
— A Leaf from the Old Forest • J. D. Cossar

... pressure more severe than on Halkett's brigade in the right centre which was composed of battalions of the 30th, the 33d, the 69th, and the 73d British regiments. We fortunately can quote from the journal of a brave officer of the 30th, a narrative of what took place in this part of the field. [This excellent journal was published in the "United Service Magazine" during the year 1852.] The late Major Macready served at Waterloo in the light company of the 30th. The extent of the peril and the carnage which Halkett's brigade had to encounter, ...
— The Fifteen Decisive Battles of The World From Marathon to Waterloo • Sir Edward Creasy, M.A.

... often asked if I still believe the views of another life set forth in "The Gates Ajar" that I am glad to use this opportunity to answer the question; though, indeed, I have been led to do so, to a certain extent, in another place, and may, perhaps, be pardoned for repeating words in which the question first ...
— McClure's Magazine, Vol. VI., No. 6, May, 1896 • Various

... and finding themselves still dry, in spite of the warning thunder, they decided to hurry on to the next stopping-place. ...
— Donald and Dorothy • Mary Mapes Dodge

... of Constantinople Benjamin makes his way to Syria. At Jerusalem he finds some two hundred Jews commanding the dyeing trade. And here we must remind ourselves that the second crusade was over and the third had not yet taken place, that Jerusalem, the City of Peace, had been in the hands of the Mohammedans or Saracens till 1099, when it fell into the hands of the Crusaders. From Jerusalem, by way of Damascus, Benjamin entered Persia, and he gives us an interesting account of Bagdad and its Khalifs. ...
— A Book of Discovery - The History of the World's Exploration, From the Earliest - Times to the Finding of the South Pole • Margaret Bertha (M. B.) Synge

... and upon the hill a most level space of a plain, which the blades of grass made green: {all} shade was wanting in the spot. After the bard, sprung from the Gods, had seated himself in this place, and touched his tuneful strings, a shade came over the spot. The tree of Chaonia[10] was not absent, nor the grove of the Heliades,[11] nor the mast-tree with its lofty branches, nor the tender lime-trees, ...
— The Metamorphoses of Ovid - Literally Translated into English Prose, with Copious Notes - and Explanations • Publius Ovidius Naso

... of note that this war cruiser was constructed in fifteen months, or three months under the stipulated contract time; in fact, the official trial of the vessel took place exactly eighteen months from the signing of the contract. Not only is this the fastest war cruiser afloat, but her owners also possess in the El Destructor what is probably the simplest torpedo catcher afloat, a vessel which has attained a speed of ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 620, November 19,1887 • Various

... you cannot change estates with me for one minute," he said, in steady, low tone. "Then you would realize the tremendous truth of what you have been saying. It is only your intellect that has reached out and grasped the idea. If you were in my place, you would discover that your heart was bursting with ...
— The Damnation of Theron Ware • Harold Frederic

... and if you are not strong enough, go back with the Eastwind who brought you. He is going away now, and will not come back for a hundred years; the time will fly in this place like a hundred hours, but that is a long time for temptation and sin. Every evening when I leave you I must say, "Come with me," and I must beckon to you, but stay behind. Do not come with me, for with every ...
— Stories from Hans Andersen • Hans Christian Andersen

... we have got to seek shelter, this place may prove as good as any," observed Whopper. "It's warmer under the rocks, and we can use some of these ...
— Guns And Snowshoes • Captain Ralph Bonehill

... my son, is but an imbroglio of dreams." Replied Kamar al-Zaman, "Leave this talk and swear to me by Allah, the All creator, the Omniscient; the Humbler of the tyrant Caesars and the Destroyer of the Chosroes, that thou knowest naught of the young lady nor of her woning-place." Quoth the King, "By the Might of Allah Almighty, the God of Moses and Abraham, I know naught of all this and never even heard of it; it is assuredly a delusion of dreams thou hast seen in sleep.' Then the Prince replied to his sire, "I will give thee a self evident proof that it happened ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... affliction our poor lost one returned to us. "Ah, madam," cried her mother, "this is but a poor place to come to after so much finery! I can afford but little entertainment to persons who have kept company only with persons of distinction; but I hope Heaven will ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol IV. • Editors: Arthur Mee and J.A. Hammerton

... attention of another member when in company or at a public place we take the braid between the thumb and little finger and stand carelessly on one leg. This is the Secret Signal and the password is Sobb (B.O.S.S. spelled backwards) which was my idea ...
— New Chronicles of Rebecca • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... surprised. For one thing it was most unusual to see the little bookkeeper abroad after nine-thirty. His usual evening procedure, when not on a vacation, was to call upon Rachel Ellis at the Snow place for an hour or so and then to return to his room over Simond's shoe store, which room he had occupied ever since the ...
— The Portygee • Joseph Crosby Lincoln

... crew to it, beginning with himself and the carpenter, and then those of the emigrants; afterwards returning the document to me. It cost him nearly three hours strenuous work to secure the signatures of the entire crew and the emigrants to the agreement; for in the first place he found the occupants of the forecastle, one and all, very unwilling—as is the case with most illiterate people—to pledge themselves by attaching their signatures or marks to my memorandum, although ...
— Overdue - The Story of a Missing Ship • Harry Collingwood

... upon this trigger would upset it, cause the noose to slip off the pegs and close with a jerk around the neck of anything that might have its head thrust into the inclosure. The bush, too, would fly back into place and there would be the intruder, really hanged by himself. It was the common form of snare, devised for small game by the boys of early Kentucky, and still used ...
— The Young Trailers - A Story of Early Kentucky • Joseph A. Altsheler

... commercial paper. mont de piete[Fr], pawnshop, my uncle's. lender, pawnbroker, money lender; usurer, loan shark. loaner V[item loaned][coll.]. lend, advance, accommodate with; lend on security; loan; pawn &c. (security) 771. intrust, invest; place out to interest, put out to interest. let, demise, lease, sett[obs3], underlet. Adj. lending &c. v.; lent &c. v.; unborrowed &c. (see borrowed &c. 788)[obs3]. Adv. in advance; on loan, ...
— Roget's Thesaurus • Peter Mark Roget

... surround the present chapel, showing a foot above the soil, are supposed to be the remains of that church, since there are amongst them a few pieces of carved stone. The most ancient Croat document existing is a deed of gift of this place and church to the Archbishop of Spalato, Pietro III., by the King Trpimir, in 837, in exchange for L11 given by the archbishop for the construction of the church and monastery of S. Peter, between the ruins of ...
— The Shores of the Adriatic - The Austrian Side, The Kuestenlande, Istria, and Dalmatia • F. Hamilton Jackson

... and watched the sharp, short struggle which he made with their hereditary enemy, consumption. Weakened by wounds and exposure, he was but ill-prepared to resist the advances of the insidious foe, and when she reached his side she saw that the hope, even of delay, was gone. So she took her place, and with ready hand, brave heart, and steady purpose, brightened ...
— Bricks Without Straw • Albion W. Tourgee

... this crown! Great poet, good citizen, you have nobly earned it! Give it an honoured place in that glorious museum of yours, which the towns and cities of the South have enriched by their gifts. May it remain there in testimony of your poetical triumphs, and attest the welcome recognition of your merits ...
— Jasmin: Barber, Poet, Philanthropist • Samuel Smiles

... I got a better job in sight. Mike Sikoria's buddy is laid up, and I'd like to take his place, if you're willing." ...
— King Coal - A Novel • Upton Sinclair

... body's light, which once declining, Those crimson clouds i' th' cheek and lips leave shining. Those counter-changed tabbies in the air (The sun once set) all of one colour are. So, when Death comes, fresh tinctures lose their place, And dismal darkness then doth smutch ...
— The Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2 • Robert Herrick

... by the Abbe Fontenu, in the Memoires de l'Academie des Inscriptions, X. p. 413, carries the antiquity of the place still eight centuries higher, representing it as the Portus Ictius, whence ...
— Account of a Tour in Normandy, Vol. I. (of 2) • Dawson Turner

... I heard nothing more; and though I often felt a charitable prompting to call at the place and see poor Bartleby, yet a certain squeamishness of I know not ...
— Bartleby, The Scrivener - A Story of Wall-Street • Herman Melville

... probable, that this ridiculous design having been defeated by such an astonishing prodigy, as none could be the author of but God himself, every body abandoned the place, which had given Him offence; and that Nimrod was the first who encompassed it afterwards with walls, settled therein his friends and confederates, and subdued those that lived round about it, beginning his empire in that place, but not confining it to so narrow ...
— The Ancient History of the Egyptians, Carthaginians, Assyrians, • Charles Rollin

... reign for more than ten minutes. The first blow dealt to its power was in certain news communicated to Lizabetha Prokofievna as to events which bad happened during her trip to see the princess. (This trip had taken place the day after that on which the prince had turned up at the Epanchins at nearly one o'clock at ...
— The Idiot • (AKA Feodor Dostoevsky) Fyodor Dostoyevsky

... off, chained fast between the horses of the hussars, and, whenever he sank from weariness, spurred on at the sabre point. Blau had his ears boxed by the Prussian minister, Stein.[9] A similar reaction took place ...
— Germany from the Earliest Period Vol. 4 • Wolfgang Menzel, Trans. Mrs. George Horrocks

... Diet. Despite the archaic form of its representation, the Finnish constitution (an offshoot of that of Sweden) has worked extremely well; and in regard to civil freedom and religious toleration, the Finns take their place among the most progressive communities of the world. Moreover, the constitution is no recent and artificial creation; it represents customs and beliefs that are deeply ingrained in a people who, like their ...
— The Development of the European Nations, 1870-1914 (5th ed.) • John Holland Rose

... to go, for he had wavered in it from day to day, finding it hard to tear himself away from that bleak land that he had come to love, as he never had loved the country which claimed him by birth. He had been called on in this place to fight for a man's station in it; he had trampled a refuge of safety for ...
— The Duke Of Chimney Butte • G. W. Ogden

... have not that assurance and can in the meantime set up an infinite network of intrigue such as we now know ran like a honeycomb through the world, then any arrangement will be broken down. This is the place where intrigue did accomplish the disintegration which made the realization of Germany's purposes almost possible. So that those people will have to make friends with their powerful neighbour Germany unless they have ...
— Woodrow Wilson as I Know Him • Joseph P. Tumulty

... do him any good—he won't mind anything I say. And what dependence can I place on him after this?" her voice sank to a tone of helpless tenderness. "It isn't his being drunk altogether; he will outgrow that, perhaps, as you say you did, and be man enough to say no next time; but it's because he ...
— Kennedy Square • F. Hopkinson Smith

... by American vessels, built and run much cheaper than British.[86] He was rigidly forbidden also to seek stores in the French islands. Such circuitous intercourse with America, by depriving British ships of the long voyage to the continent, would place the French islands in the obnoxious relation of entrepot to their neighbors, which Holland had once occupied towards England. In all legislation minute care was taken to prevent such injury to navigation. Direct trade ...
— Sea Power in its Relations to the War of 1812 - Volume 1 • Alfred Thayer Mahan

... was much handicapped. He dared not refer to the conversation which had taken place between himself and Ned Wilson during their quarrel, for fear of in any way bringing Mary's name into evidence. Up to the present, no one thought of connecting her with the matter in any definite way, and Paul was determined ...
— The Day of Judgment • Joseph Hocking

... case required my closest attention, for I place far more confidence in deductions from facial expression and tones of the voice, than from the ...
— The Gold Bag • Carolyn Wells

... for his participation in the chase of Miste that ended in that ill-starred miscreant's death. Nor did I learn, until months had elapsed, that my good friend John Turner had also hastened to Nice, taking thither with him a great Parisian lawyer to defend me in the trial that took place while I lay ill at Genoa. Sister Renee, moreover, had not laid aside her womanly guile when she took the veil, for she concealed from me with perfect success that I was under guard night and day in my bedroom at the Hotel de Genes. ...
— Dross • Henry Seton Merriman

... wasn't it, that I wrote? Things have been happening in those five days. The MacRae and I have mapped out a plan of campaign, and are stirring up this place to its sluggish depths. I like him less and less, but we have declared a sort of working truce. And the man IS a worker. I always thought I had sufficient energy myself, but when an improvement is to be introduced, I toil along panting in his wake. He is as stubborn and tenacious ...
— Dear Enemy • Jean Webster

... we shall meet again in Rome!" said Elizabeth, rosy, and not knowing in truth what to say. "This place has turned my head a little!"—she looked round her, raising her hand to the spectacle as though in pretty appeal to him to share her own exhilaration—"but it will be all over so soon—and you know I don't forget old ...
— Lady Merton, Colonist • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... viewed as possessing those qualities; and moreover, the clause 'free from evil, from old age,' &c. enjoins a meditation on the Self as possessing those qualities. It is therefore first to be meditated on in its essential nature, and then there takes place a repetition of the meditation on it in order to bring in those special qualities. The case is analogous to that of 'the offerings.' There is a text 'He is to offer a purodasa on eleven potsherds to Indra the ruler, to Indra the supreme ruler, to Indra the self-ruler.' This ...
— The Vedanta-Sutras with the Commentary by Ramanuja - Sacred Books of the East, Volume 48 • Trans. George Thibaut

... pillared caryatides Neglected, weathered, stained by passing time, Wearing in place of garments that should please, The skins of sloughing cobras, foul ...
— Translations of Shakuntala and Other Works • Kaalidaasa

... course, became the idol of his set. He was a clear-headed boy, it happened, and he discouraged all this sort of hero worship possible; making light of what he had done, and declaring that when the next took place Gabe Larkins was going to ...
— Fred Fenton on the Track - or, The Athletes of Riverport School • Allen Chapman

... an enormous, comfortable, well-arranged flat which they did not, could not, love, where they were bored to death. Instead of their old friendly belongings, they obtained furniture and hangings which were strangers to them. There was no place left for memories. The first years of their married life were swept away from their thoughts.... It is a great misfortune for two people living together to have the ties which bind them to their past love broken! The image of their love is a safeguard against the disappointment ...
— Jean-Christophe Journey's End • Romain Rolland

... Lectures was publicly announced, I had many misgivings as to the propriety of my taking a part in them, thinking that my place might be better filled by an older and more experienced man. To my experience, however, such as it was, I resolved to adhere, and I have therefore described things as they revealed themselves to my own eyes, and ...
— Fragments of science, V. 1-2 • John Tyndall

... judge, from his lofty place, applies the code to the facts submitted to him, the commissary of police observes and watches all the odious circumstances that the law cannot reach. He is perforce the confidant of disgraceful details, domestic crimes, and ...
— File No. 113 • Emile Gaboriau

... wooed destruction: 'It is presumption and a high contempt In subjects to dispute what kings can do,' He whimpered. 'Even as it is blasphemy To thwart the will of God.' He waved his hand, And rose. 'These men must be released, at once!' Then, as I think, to seek a safer place, He waddled from the room, his rickety legs Doubling beneath that great green feather-bed He calls his 'person.'—I shall dream to-night Of spiders, Camden.—But in half an hour, Inigo Jones was armed with Right Divine To save ...
— Collected Poems - Volume Two (of 2) • Alfred Noyes

... grand sport to stand on the quarter-deck and watch all this. Before long there was nothing to be seen on other side but stretches of low swampy land, covered with stunted cypress trees, from which drooped delicate streamers of Spanish moss—a fine place for alligators and Congo snakes. Here and there we passed a yellow sand-bar, and here and there a snag lifted its nose out of the water like ...
— The Story of a Bad Boy • Thomas Bailey Aldrich

... crevice he saw the entrance of a stout, good-natured-looking young man, whistling a popular song. He was probably a clerk or young mechanic, who, after a hard day's work, had been to some cheap place of amusement. Wholly unconscious of Jasper's presence, the young man undressed himself, still continuing to whistle, and got into bed. It was so light outside that he had not ...
— Frank and Fearless - or The Fortunes of Jasper Kent • Horatio Alger Jr.

... Douglas corrected. "The hardest usually is finding out how the secret became public in the first place." ...
— The Electronic Mind Reader • John Blaine

... in time to us, therefore they were the authors of the first inventions. For that, they cannot be regarded as our superiors. If we had been in their place we should have been the inventors, like them; if they were in ours, they would add to those inventions, like us. There is no great mystery in that. We must impute equal merit to the early thinkers who showed the way and ...
— The Idea of Progress - An Inquiry Into Its Origin And Growth • J. B. Bury

... done, and added, that he pledged himself to restore the paper when the pope had read it, the hand relaxed its grasp, and the act was released. The archdeacon handed it up to the pope; but when he tried to leave the vault, he found that a secret power prevented him from stirring from the place, and he was forced to remain there as hostage till the scroll was read and replaced in the hand of the bishop; he then found that his limbs had resumed their power, and he was able to quit the spot. Clement V., anxious to repair ...
— Barn and the Pyrenees - A Legendary Tour to the Country of Henri Quatre • Louisa Stuart Costello

... corresponding to this four years ago, all thoughts were anxiously directed to an impending civil war. All dreaded it, all sought to avoid it. While the inaugural address was being delivered from this place, devoted altogether to saving the Union without war, insurgent agents were in the city seeking to destroy it with war— seeking to dissolve the Union and divide the effects by negotiation. Both parties deprecated ...
— Public Speaking • Irvah Lester Winter

... statue at entrance, by Solon Borglum, of New York. Patriarchal. Suggests Joaquin Miller. Warlike trappings of horse picturesque, but sixteenth century Spanish, out of place. ...
— The City of Domes • John D. Barry

... find any guilt therein," broke in Leo. "She is not another man's wife, and it appears that she has married me according to the custom of this awful place, so who is the worse? Any way, madam," he went on, "whatever she has done I have done too, so if she is to be punished let me be punished also; and I tell thee," he went on, working himself up into a fury, "that if thou biddest one of those dead and dumb villains to touch ...
— She • H. Rider Haggard

... I ask that boy he should do me one thing, right away he gets lessons! With me, that lessons-talk don't go no more. Every time you get put down in school, I'm surprised there's a place left lower where they can put you. Working-papers for such a ...
— Humoresque - A Laugh On Life With A Tear Behind It • Fannie Hurst

... an one who had tortiously, &c, disseised his father Robert.' And he laid the descent thus: 'From Robert descended the right, &c, to Adam the present demandant, as his youngest son and heir, according to the custom of such a place, &c.' ...
— The Customs of Old England • F. J. Snell

... him to the lower edge of the camp, and he silently pointed her to the place where the ...
— Two Arrows - A Story of Red and White • William O. Stoddard

... rascal, had about twenty dollars in his possession which he insisted on gambling away before leaving town. Runt was comfortably drunk, and as Bob urged humoring him, I gave my consent, provided he would place it all at one bet, to which Pickett agreed. Leaving the greater part of the boys holding the horses, some half-dozen of us entered the nearest gambling-house, and Runt bet nineteen dollars "Alce" on the first card which ...
— The Outlet • Andy Adams

... public mind for great military efforts. A new generation had grown up, which could not remember the siege of Turin or the slaughter of Malplaquet; which knew war by nothing but its trophies; and which, while it looked with pride on the tapestries at Blenheim, or the statue in the Place of Victories, little thought by what privations, by what waste of private fortunes, by how many bitter tears, ...
— Critical and Historical Essays, Volume III (of 3) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... mid-September. "Are you game for it, Eleanor?" Edith said one night at dinner; "we can find some pleasant place ...
— The Vehement Flame • Margaret Wade Campbell Deland

... started, and she now came forth from her chamber refreshed, the course of her slothful blood hastened; her eyes gleamed with impatience for action; her whole being changed, rejuvenated, filled with a new life. She came also with a full knowledge of all that had taken place in the interim of her absence from Katherine. She came well prepared for a bout, and blushed not at the subterfuges and mean, paltry artifices, aye, a full battery of chicaneries that awaited her use, as she crossed the maid's chamber threshold. "'All is ...
— Mistress Penwick • Dutton Payne

... at Clayton Station, the only passenger to alight, its hurried retreat down the long straight of converging metals, a rapidly diminishing cube, seemed to be measuring for me the isolation of the place. Clayton appeared to be two railway platforms and a row of elms across an empty road. After the last rumble of the train, which had the note of a distant cry of derision, there closed in the quiet of a place where affairs had not even begun. It ...
— Old Junk • H. M. Tomlinson

... went together a furlong from the want-way into a little hollow place wherethrough ran a clear stream betwixt thick-leaved alders. The carle led Ralph to the very lip of the water so that the bushes covered them; there they sat down and drew what they had from their wallets, and so fell to meat; and amidst of ...
— The Well at the World's End • William Morris

... River; and another part, under General S. R. Curtis, in the direction of Springfield, Missouri. General Grant was then at Paducah, and General Curtis was under orders for Rolls. I was ordered to take Curtis's place in command of the camp of instruction, at Benton Barracks, on the ground back of North St. Louis, now used as the Fair Grounds, by the ...
— Memoirs of Three Civil War Generals, Complete • U. S. Grant, W. T. Sherman, P. H. Sheridan

... felt, or however she might interpret the confession, she acted with her customary discretion; affected, after a few tender reproaches, to place implicit credit in her lord's account, and volunteered to prevent all scandal by the probable story that the earl, being prevented from coming in person for his daughter, as he had purposed, by fresh news of the rebellion which might call him from London with the early day, had commissioned ...
— The Last Of The Barons, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... grown in the latter, it will be found conducive to the health and flowering of the plants if, during the summer months, they can be placed in a frame with a south aspect, removing them back to the house again on the decline of summer weather. Wherever the place selected for Cactuses may be, whether in a large plant-house, or a frame, or a window, it is of vital importance to the plants that the position should be exposed to bright sunshine during most of the day. Without sunlight, they can ...
— Cactus Culture For Amateurs • W. Watson

... your honest sonsie face, [jolly] Great chieftain o' the puddin'-race! Aboon them a' ye tak your place, [Above] Painch, tripe, or thairm: [Paunch, guts] Weel are ye wordy o' a grace [worthy] As ...
— Robert Burns - How To Know Him • William Allan Neilson

... vial in his hand, and looking at it for a moment, the dying man said: "I suppose, doctor, this is your last resort?" The doctor replied: "I am sorry to say, governor, that it is. Acute inflammation of the intestine has already taken place; and unless it is removed, mortification will ensue, if it has not already commenced, which I fear." "What will be the effect of this medicine?" said the old man. "It will give you immediate relief, or"—the kind-hearted doctor could not finish the sentence. His patient took up the word: "You ...
— Patrick Henry • Moses Coit Tyler

... Who for now nearly an entire year had not held a meeting of the senate, and then held one in such a manner that they prevented the expression of sentiments regarding the commonwealth? Let them not place too much hope in the fears of others; the grievances which they were now suffering appeared to men more oppressive than any they ...
— Roman History, Books I-III • Titus Livius

... months since our honored president, Gov. Washburn, was suddenly taken away, and we have not yet found his successor; and now, Dr. Powell has been removed almost as suddenly, and we can scarcely hope to find one to take his place. Our only consolation is, that God makes no mistakes, and that, while men die, His ...
— The American Missionary - Volume 42, No. 2, February 1888 • Various

... near at hand. The sheep behind the pasture-bars sent their greeting over the dewy fields, and the cows in the yard "mowed" placidly as they stirred one another with soft, slow movements. How fair and peaceful the place looked! How full of calm ...
— David Fleming's Forgiveness • Margaret Murray Robertson

... the yard gate, however, before the cow-boy, a delighted spectator and auditor of the affair, had loosed the fierce watch-dog, which flew after her. Fortunately Richard saw what took place, but the animal, which was generally chained up, did not heed his recall, and the poor woman had already felt his teeth, when Richard got him by the throat. She looked pale and frightened, but kept her composure wonderfully, and when Richard, who was ...
— St. George and St. Michael • George MacDonald

... Dr. Sommers took his successor through, the surgical ward. Dr. Raymond, whose place he had been holding for a month, was a young, carefully dressed man, fresh from a famous eastern hospital. The nurses eyed him favorably. He was absolutely correct. When the surgeons reached the bed marked 8, Dr. Sommers paused. It was the case he had operated ...
— The Web of Life • Robert Herrick

... actor in the Massacre of St Bartholomew's Day, his fate, ii. 562; he is executed on the Place de Greve, ...
— History of the Rise of the Huguenots - Volume 2 • Henry Baird

... the competition to engage him was most keen: it was almost the first thing one thought about when clients came to consult upon a new scheme. He would go from one committee to another, by some extraordinary means always being at the place where he was most needed. It was marvellous how he kept all these matters distinct in his brain; he was never in confusion or at fault. In one room he would open a case, say an Improvement Bill, with a brilliant speech ...
— Memoirs of James Robert Hope-Scott, Volume 2 • Robert Ornsby

... they were wild with impatience to get out of this place of dangers. Their fingers trembled as they untied the horses, and it was as much as they could do to get the animals to stand still long ...
— The Outdoor Girls in the Saddle - Or, The Girl Miner of Gold Run • Laura Lee Hope

... up and down in extreme agitation). What! I must realize it now in earnest, Because I toyed too freely with the thought! Accursed he who dallies with a devil! And must I—I must realize it now— Now, while I have the power, it must take place! ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... impression that at this time Burr was devoid of prestige on earth. Politically, this is true; but respecting his standing with the legal fraternity, it is wholly false. He had influence, and he used it, securing the stranger a place in a New York office, where his risk depended only upon himself. More than ...
— A Breath of Prairie and other stories • Will Lillibridge

... Death? Could I live, and lack thee? Thou, O king, Hast lands and lordships—and a royal wife - And rule of seas that tire the seamew's wing - And fame as far as fame can travel; I, What have I save this home wherein to die, Except thou love me? Nay, nor home were this, No place to die or live in, were I sure Thou didst not love me. Swear not by this kiss That love lives longer—faith may more endure - Than one poor kiss that passes with the breath Of lips that gave it life at ...
— Locrine - A Tragedy • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... commonly called Si Roden—Herbert's uncle—lived in one of those old houses at Paddock Place, at the bottom of the hill where Hanbridge begins. Their front steps are below the level of the street, and their backyards look out on the Granville Third Pit and the works of the Empire Porcelain Company. ...
— The Matador of the Five Towns and Other Stories • Arnold Bennett

... in the stream just above the steep bank made a quiet place in the current. Here their boat was moored. As they pushed out from the shore they were swept down the stream, but a few strong pulls carried them beyond the swiftest part of the current, and then they easily rowed back to the landing at the mouth of the creek, where ...
— Uncle Robert's Geography (Uncle Robert's Visit, V.3) • Francis W. Parker and Nellie Lathrop Helm

... two may not be out of place here on the practical difficulties which beset an artist who opens an Exhibition on his own account, and is forced by circumstances to become his own "exploiteur." Men may have worked with a more ambitious object, but certainly no man can ever have worked harder than I did at this period. Outside ...
— The Confessions of a Caricaturist, Vol 2 (of 2) • Harry Furniss

... not, as the Satirist asserts, spare their kind. We are disappointed at not finding any coins, nor any other good souvenirs, to bring away with us. The height of Taormina is sufficient to keep it from fever, which is very prevalent at Giardini below. Its bay was once a great place for catching mullet for the Roman market. It seems to have been the Torbay of Sicily. Some fish love their ease, and rejoice not in turbulent waters. The muraena, or lamprey, on the contrary, was sought in the very whirlpools of Charybdis. The modern Roman, ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. CCCXLV. July, 1844. Vol. LVI. • Various

... ninety years five times repaired and repointed. We cannot now say whether the original design was at all closely followed in the rebuilding, but its present likeness to St. Michael's suggests doubts. The lowest stage which takes the place of the octagon and may be an intentional imitation of it, has almost upright sides with two-light windows on the cardinal faces and panelled ones on the oblique sides, while the remaining stages correspond in number and partly ...
— Bell's Cathedrals: The Churches of Coventry - A Short History of the City and Its Medieval Remains • Frederic W. Woodhouse

... should be recreant to my method, and the reader would have the right to accuse me of charlatanism and bad faith, if I had nothing further to advance concerning prescription. I showed, in the first place, that appropriation of land is illegal; and that, supposing it to be legal, it must be accompanied by equality of property. I have shown, in the second place, that universal consent proves nothing in favor of property; and that, if it ...
— What is Property? - An Inquiry into the Principle of Right and of Government • P. J. Proudhon

... not find the lioness in the bushes, and it was evident that she had retreated to some other place; and Swanevelt, who was an old lion-hunter, gave his opinion that she would be found in the direction near to where the lion was killed. They went therefore in that direction, and found that she was in the clump of mimosas to which the lion ...
— The Mission; or Scenes in Africa • Captain Frederick Marryat

... The more he might persevere in such an attempt, the more dogged and steady she would become. He therefore soon gave that up. He had already given it up when he threatened to accuse her of perjury, and resolved that as he could not shake her he would shake the confidence which the jury might place in her. He could not make a fool of her, and therefore he would make her out to be a rogue. Her evidence would stand alone, or nearly alone; and in this way he might turn her firmness to his own purpose, and explain that her dogged resolution to stick to one plain statement ...
— Orley Farm • Anthony Trollope

... as you would have it, that the Deity is in the form and image of a man. Where is his abode? Where is his habitation? Where is the place where he is to be found? What is his course of life? And what is it that constitutes the happiness which you assert that he enjoys? For it seems necessary that a being who is to be happy must use and enjoy what belongs to him. And with regard to place, even those natures ...
— Cicero's Tusculan Disputations - Also, Treatises On The Nature Of The Gods, And On The Commonwealth • Marcus Tullius Cicero

... cockades in certain cocked hats, which they wore; and the horses drawing the said post-chaise then and there being decorated with branches of laurel, to and over London Bridge, and through the City of London, unto and over Blackfriars Bridge, and unto a certain place called the Marsh Gate, in the Parish of St. Mary Lambeth, in the County of Surry, with intention thereby to induce the liege subjects, &c. whom they should pass, and who should see them in their route and way from Dartford to near the Marsh Gate, to suppose and believe, and ...
— The Trial of Charles Random de Berenger, Sir Thomas Cochrane, • William Brodie Gurney

... presented not as being merely the province of shrewdness, or greediness, or petty personal gratification, but of great projects, of great brain-battles, a field for the exercising of talent, daring, imagination, appealing to the strength of a strong man, filling the same place in men's lives that was once filled by the incentives of war, kindling in man the desire for the leadership of men. The hero of the story, "Joel Thorpe," is one of those men, huge of body, keen of brain, with cast iron nerves, as ...
— A Collection of Stories, Reviews and Essays • Willa Cather

... Altamont, and Miss Amory crying and as pale as a sheet; and Altamont fuming about—a regular kick up. They were two hours in the chambers; and the old woman went whooping off in a cab. She was much worse than the young one. I called in Grosvenor-place next day to see if I could be of any service, but they were gone without so much as thanking me: and the day after I had business of my own to attend to—a bad business too," said Mr. Huxter, gloomily. "But it's done, and ...
— The History of Pendennis, Vol. 2 - His Fortunes and Misfortunes, His Friends and His Greatest Enemy • William Makepeace Thackeray

... good order, decorum, and inoffensive cheerfulness which our humble masquerades presented. It does especial credit to the dispositions and good sense of our men that, though all the officers entered fully into the spirit of these amusements, which took place once a month alternately on board each ship, no instance occurred of anything that could interfere with the regular discipline, or at all weaken the respect of the men towards their superiors. Ours were masquerades without licentiousness—carnivals ...
— Journal of the Third Voyage for the Discovery of a North-West Passage • William Edward Parry

... the Place des Hommes, a little public square of Arles, which somehow quite misses its effect. As a city, indeed, Arles quite misses its effect in every way; and if it is a charming place, as I think it is, I can hardly tell the reason why. The straight-nosed ...
— Seeing Europe with Famous Authors, Volume 3 • Various

... is a good place, easily made better, and who wish to know how to help it, will enjoy reading this book. Those who do not so believe and wish may not enjoy it so much, but it will do ...
— The Forerunner, Volume 1 (1909-1910) • Charlotte Perkins Gilman

... Miss Northcott, and lives with an old aunt of hers in Abercrombie Place. Nobody knows anything about her people, or where she comes from. Anyhow, she is about the most unlucky girl ...
— The Captain of the Pole-Star and Other Tales • Arthur Conan Doyle

... world theory, one scheme of world history which I wish you to hold clearly and as definitely as possible in your minds, while I place alongside of ...
— Our Unitarian Gospel • Minot Savage

... and I called recently. Hermione was not in, and her mother suggested that we wait for her. Hermione's mother looks upon all of Hermione's friends with more or less suspicion, and she would not permit Fothergil in particular to be about the place for a moment if she were not obliged to; but she does not have the requisite stern- ness of character to resist her daughter. Fothergil, knowing that he is not approved of, scarcely does himself justice ...
— Hermione and Her Little Group of Serious Thinkers • Don Marquis

... There will be no business to be done, for vessels will not come up the Thames and risk infection, nor, indeed, would they be admitted into ports, either in England or abroad, after coming from an infected place. Therefore I could leave without any loss in the way of trade. It will, of course, depend upon the heaviness of the malady, but if it becomes widespread we shall perhaps go for a visit to my wife's ...
— When London Burned • G. A. Henty

... started the subject of wages arrestment by a series of letters in the Reformer's Gazette, Daily Mail, and Herald. The subject had long been felt to be a sore grievance and rock of offence among the working classes, and periodical agitations had taken place without leading to any decided action. From the very first Glasgow took the initiative in seeking to modify or get rid altogether of a law which pressed with greater severity on the lower orders than, perhaps, any other enactment ...
— Western Worthies - A Gallery of Biographical and Critical Sketches of West - of Scotland Celebrities • J. Stephen Jeans

... ventured to remonstrate with him upon the facility with which he had become a party in so treasonable a matter. "Consider, my lord," continued she, "that Scotland is now entirely in the power of the English monarch. His garrisons occupy our towns, his creatures hold every place of ...
— The Scottish Chiefs • Miss Jane Porter

... territories.[137] And, if we may trust the verdict of contemporaries and his own confession at St. Helena, Bonaparte never expected any other result from these letters than an increase of his popularity in France. This was enhanced by the British reply, which declared that His Majesty could not place his reliance on "general professions of pacific dispositions": France had waged aggressive war, levied exactions, and overthrown institutions in neighbouring States; and the British Government could not as yet discern any abandonment of this system: something more was required for a durable peace: ...
— The Life of Napoleon I (Volumes, 1 and 2) • John Holland Rose

... house, and Laura's disappointment over her curtailed European travels was mitigated by the anticipation of her pleasure in settling in the new home. This had not been possible immediately after their marriage. For nearly two years the great place had been given over to contractors, architects, decorators, and gardeners, and Laura and her husband had lived, while in Chicago, at a hotel, giving up the one-time rectory on Cass Street to ...
— The Pit • Frank Norris

... anywhere" he said. "This is a favourite place of hers because the wind-flowers grow here. Somehow I've got a sort of feeling—" He stopped short. "Why, there she ...
— Greatheart • Ethel M. Dell

... for any other property. Money has a number of functions but in exchange it is a medium by which the value of articles is conveyed. It takes the place of the bags which conveyed the wheat, of the crates which contained the potatoes, of the baskets which carried the peaches, and the wrapping which held the cotton or ...
— Usury - A Scriptural, Ethical and Economic View • Calvin Elliott



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