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Rede   Listen
noun
Rede  n.  
1.
Advice; counsel; suggestion. (Obs. or Scot.) "There was none other remedy ne reed."
2.
A word or phrase; a motto; a proverb; a wise saw. (Obs.) "This rede is rife."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Rede" Quotes from Famous Books



... So wysse me now what me is best to doo That am distraught wit[h] my self so That I ne wote what way for to torne Sauf by my self soleyn for to morne Hangyng in balance betwix hope and drede Wit[h] oute comfort remedye or rede For hope biddet[h] pursue and assaye And agaynward drede answert[h] naye And now wit[h] hope ...
— The Temple of Glass • John Lydgate

... that of the chase. It comes down to us from our prehistoric ancestors who lived by the chase, got their daily food by it, wooed and won by it, and fought their battles by it in that dim dawn of time when might was right and the law of tooth and claw was the only rede. ...
— The Radio Boys with the Revenue Guards • Gerald Breckenridge

... amiable youth! Your heart can ne'er be wanting! May prudence, fortitude, and truth Erect your brow undaunting. In ploughman phrase, God send you speed Still daily to grow wiser; And may ye better reck the rede [heed the advice] Than ever ...
— Robert Burns - How To Know Him • William Allan Neilson

... cross," she said; "but how can a man worship a cross and preach it and conquer thereby? I cannot interpret this rede, yet I do not doubt but that it shall all come true, and that you, Olaf, and I are doomed to be joined in the same fate, whatever it may be, and with us some other who has wronged you, Steinar perchance, or Iduna herself. Well, of this at least I am glad, for if I have loved the father, I think ...
— The Wanderer's Necklace • H. Rider Haggard

... first occupied by the clan of some chief, whose name is compounded with this syllable ing. Thus the Uffingas, the children of Offa, formed a settlement at Uffinggaston, or Uffington; the Redingas, or sons of Rede, settled at Reading; the Billings at Billinge and Billingham; the Wokings or Hocings, sons of Hoc, at Woking and Wokingham. The Billings and Wokings first settled at Billinge and Woking; and then like bees they swarmed, and started another hive of ...
— English Villages • P. H. Ditchfield

... it is as with individuals: Can they rede the riddle of Destiny? This English Nation, will it get to know the meaning of its strange new Today? Is there sense enough extant, discoverable anywhere or anyhow, in our united twenty-seven million heads to discern the same; valour ...
— Past and Present - Thomas Carlyle's Collected Works, Vol. XIII. • Thomas Carlyle

... "You have heard my rede on burnings, Helgi. My scheme is to carry off Liot in his sleep. They will keep no watch. The very dogs will be drunk, and I think it will not be so difficult as it seems. Will you come ...
— Vandrad the Viking - The Feud and the Spell • J. Storer Clouston

... desiringe to have hime a sonne worthy suche parents, ceasseth not aswell concerninge all other things for hime mete and necessary, as also in lerninge, t'expresse his tendre love and affection towardes hime, serchinge by all meanes possible howe he may moste proffitte, dailie heringe hime to rede sumwhatt in thenglishe tongue, and advertisenge hime of the naturell and true kynde of pronuntiacn therof, expoundinge also and declaringe the etimologie and native signification of suche wordes as we have borowed of the Latines or Frenche menue, not evyn so comonly used ...
— Early English Meals and Manners • Various

... quaintly summed up in an old rhyme: "With a red man read thy rede, With a brown man break thy bread, On a pale man draw thy knife, From a black ...
— The Dramatic Works of John Dryden Vol. I. - With a Life of the Author • Sir Walter Scott

... to the beautiful specimens which have been rescued from tombs in Durham, Worcester, and elsewhere. They seem hardly to belong to the same period, so weak are the designs and the composition of the groups. Though Mr. Rede Fowke gives the Abbe de la Rue's doubts as to the accepted period of the Bayeux tapestry, which he assigns to the Empress Matilda, he yet leans to other equally good authorities who consider the work as being coeval ...
— Needlework As Art • Marian Alford

... The ioyfull birdis merily did syng For myrth of Phebus tendir bem{e}s schene{2}; Swete war the vapouris, soft the morowing{3}, Halesum the vale, depaynt wyth flouris ying{4}; The air attemperit, sobir, and amene{5}; In quhite and rede was all the feld besene{6} Throu Naturis nobil fresch anamalyng{7}, In mirthfull May, of eviry ...
— English Dialects From the Eighth Century to the Present Day • Walter W. Skeat

... my brother, Do not as some ungracious pastors do, Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven, Whilst like a puffed and reckless libertine, Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads, And recks not his own rede.—Shakspeare. ...
— The Golden Censer - The duties of to-day, the hopes of the future • John McGovern

... his mother’s rede, And himself to the law address’d, His brothers twain had remained unslain, And their feud ...
— Alf the Freebooter - Little Danneved and Swayne Trost and other Ballads • Thomas J. Wise

... Stretched in his gore There lieth one more! By the Pope's triple crown there are twenty and four! Twenty-four trunks I ween are there But their heads and their limbs are no-body knows where! Ay, twenty-four corpses, I rede there be, Though one got away, ...
— The Haunted Hour - An Anthology • Various

... a beggarman's bags, When no silver groat he has? So, master mine, I rede you well, E'en let the ...
— The Bon Gaultier Ballads • William Edmonstoune Aytoun

... then mowing the stubbles. "In Somersetshire,'' he says, "they do shere theyr wheat very lowe; and the wheate strawe that they purpose to make thacke of, they do not threshe it, but cut off the ears, and bynd it in sheves, and call it rede, and therewith they thacke theyr houses.'' He recommends the practice of setting up corn in shocks, with two sheaves to cover eight, instead of ten sheaves as at present—probably owing to the straw being then shorter. The corn was commonly housed; but if ...
— Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia

... these matters I shall give heed, my Lady; wherefore I will ask leave of thee, and be gone; and to-morrow I will see thee again, and lay some rede before thee. Meantime, be of good cheer, for thou shalt be made as much of as may be, and live in mickle joy if thou wilt. And if any so much as give thee a hard word, it shall ...
— Child Christopher • William Morris

... diese Reise, dass auch wir selbst in gleicher Weise Mit Eifer dafr Sorge tragen, das Land der Heimat zu erfragen. Doch ist dies, glaub' ich, nicht bekannt: das Paradies wird es genannt. Hoch rhmen ich es kann und muss, doch fehlet mir der Rede Fluss. Und wenn auch jedes meiner Glieder Rede und Sprache gbe wieder, 5 So htt' ich's niemals unternommen, mit seinem Lob zu End' zu kommen. Doch siehst du's nicht mit eignen Augen, was knnen meine Worte taugen? Und selbst dann ...
— An anthology of German literature • Calvin Thomas

... Rede me no redes and riddles. Never yet I have loved thee more, and yet I have loved thee well, Than now that loving-kindness borne toward love Makes thee so gracious, ...
— Rosamund, Queen of the Lombards • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... will seek in vain for a moral standard whether he seeks it in the book of Nature or in the book of God. I should not move him by pointing out that in the Old Testament we are told an eye for an eye is our due, and in the New the rede is to turn the left cheek after receiving a blow on the right. Nor would he be moved by referring him to the history of mankind, to the Boer War, for instance, or the massacres which occur daily in Russia; ...
— Memoirs of My Dead Life • George Moore

... rather have been well attacked than have been handled in the namby-pamby, old-woman style of the cautious Oxford Professor. (404/5. This no doubt refers to Professor Phillips' "Life on the Earth," 1860, a book founded on the author's "Rede Lecture," given before the University of Cambridge. Reference to this work will be found in "Life and Letters," II., ...
— More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II - Volume II (of II) • Charles Darwin

... its flames that swell quenched now for ever, extinct and dead? Who shall fear thee? or who shall hear the word thy servants who feared thee said? Lord, art thou as the dead gods now, whose arm is shortened, whose rede is read? ...
— Poems and Ballads (Third Series) - Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles - Swinburne—Vol. III • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... to the many words of wariness Spoken by me your father, add this word, That, tried by time, our unknown company Be held for honest: over-swift are tongues To slander strangers, over-light is speech To bring pollution on a stranger's name. Therefore I rede you, bring no shame on me Now when man's eye beholds your maiden prime. Lovely is beauty's ripening harvest-field, But ill to guard; and men and beasts, I wot, And birds and creeping things make prey of it. And when the fruit is ripe for love, the voice Of Aphrodite bruiteth it abroad, The while ...
— Suppliant Maidens and Other Plays • AEschylus

... hear how they cry and beg, the poor things! Come here, and dip into thy father's head. The poor dog no longer feels it. So! that'll do. For the skull, concern thee no further. In a quarter of an hour, it shall be where it should be. But now, I rede thee, look that thou art presently ready to marry, and neglect not bidding good plenty of guests; but invite especially those that have hitherto tightly toused, mocked, and scorned thee. If thou hast lack of coin, thou wottest where Godfather Stringstriker dwells. ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Vol. 56, No. 346, August, 1844 • Various

... name should really be spelled, Aelfred, [Footnote: That is, the rede or councel of the elves. A great many Old-English names are called after the elves or fairies.] was the youngest son of King Aethelwulf, and was born at Wantage in Berkshire in 849. His mother was Osburh daughter of Oslac the King's cup-bearer, who came of the royal house ...
— Heroes Every Child Should Know • Hamilton Wright Mabie

... To me, or another, thy gold harp lend; This moment boune {f:8} thee, and straight begone! I rede {f:9} thee, do it, my own dear son." Look out, look ...
— Romantic Ballads - translated from the Danish; and Miscellaneous Pieces • George Borrow

... sheweth that dreames sometyme come to passe by one meane or other. And he that desyreth to knowe more of dreames wrytten in our englysshe tonge, let hym rede the tale of the nounnes preste, that G. Chauser wrote: and for the skeles howe dreames and sweuens[189] are caused, the begynnynge of the Boke of Fame, the whiche the sayde Chauser compiled with many an ...
— Shakespeare Jest-Books; - Reprints of the Early and Very Rare Jest-Books Supposed - to Have Been Used by Shakespeare • Unknown

... mother, canst thou rede, All underneath a green hill's side, How it with Thorelil shall speed?" In such peril through ...
— The Dalby Bear - and Other Ballads • Anonymous

... Cakes, and brither Scots, Frae Maidenkirk to Johnnie Groats— If there's a hole in a' your coats, I rede you tent it: A chield's amang you, takin' notes, And, ...
— Robert Burns • Principal Shairp

... mine, Who'll rede me riddles three? And she who answers best of all Shall be my own ladye!" I ween they blush'd as maidens do When such rare words they hear— "Now speak thy riddles, if thou wilt, Thou gay ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 57, No. 352, February 1845 • Various

... of this little volume the section on Mind and Motion which forms, in accordance with a suggestion of the author's, a general introduction, was delivered at Cambridge as the Rede Lecture in 1885, and was printed in the Contemporary Review for June in that year. The chapter on The World as an Eject was published, almost as it now stands, in the Contemporary Review for July, 1886. A paper on The Fallacy of Materialism, of which Mr. Romanes incorporated the more important ...
— Mind and Motion and Monism • George John Romanes

... as clearly shown in the illustration. "This is a riddle," quoth he, "that I did once set before my fellow townsmen at Baldeswell, that is in Norfolk, and, by Saint Joce, there was no man among them that could rede it aright. And yet it is withal full easy, for all that I do desire is that, by the moving of one cheese at a time from one stool unto another, ye shall remove all the cheeses to the stool at the other end without ever putting any cheese ...
— The Canterbury Puzzles - And Other Curious Problems • Henry Ernest Dudeney

... much harm shall grow; My destiny is for to die A shameful death, I trow; Or else to flee. The one must be. None other way I know, But to withdraw as an out-law, And take me to my bow. Wherefore, adieu, my own heart true! None other rede I can: For I must to the green wood ...
— A Bundle of Ballads • Various

... all Metaphysics had hitherto proved so inexpressibly unproductive! The secret of Man's Being is still like the Sphinx's secret: a riddle that he cannot rede; and for ignorance of which he suffers death, the worst death, a spiritual. What are your Axioms, and Categories, and Systems, and Aphorisms? Words, words. High Air-castles are cunningly built of Words, the Words well bedded also in good Logic-mortar; wherein, however, no Knowledge will ...
— Sartor Resartus - The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdrockh • Thomas Carlyle

... King Artour, Of which that Bretons speken great honour, All was this land fulfilled of faerie; The Elf queen, with her joly company, Danced full oft in many a grene mead. This was the old opinion, as I rede— I speake of many hundred years ago, But now can no man see no elves mo. For now the great charity and prayers Of limitours,[39] and other holy freres, That searchen every land and every stream, As thick as ...
— Letters On Demonology And Witchcraft • Sir Walter Scott

... religion, and ye mightie work ye old dead Luther did doe by ye grace of God. Then next about poetry, and Master Shaxpur did rede a part of his King Henry IV., ye which, it seemeth unto me, is not of ye value of an arsefull of ashes, yet they praised it bravely, ...
— 1601 - Conversation as it was by the Social Fireside in the Time of the Tudors • Mark Twain

... 'I rede you do as this knight wills,' she said; 'for, amidst the little sticklers of spies that are here, this knight, this emperor of spies, moves as a pillow of shadow. He stalks amongst them as, in the ...
— The Fifth Queen Crowned • Ford Madox Ford

... Wildgrave spurred his ardent steed And, launching forward with a bound, "Who for thy drowsy priestlike rede Would leave the jovial ...
— Hero Tales and Legends of the Rhine • Lewis Spence

... bed," quoth she, "that hast received two, Thou shalt answer for two, and not for one; Where is the greater part away y-gone? Alas, what shall I wretched wight become? For though so be no help shall hither come, Home to my country dare I not for dread, I can myselfe in this case not rede." Why should I tell more of her complaining? It is so long it were a heavy thing. In her Epistle Naso telleth all. But shortly to the ende tell I shall. The goddes have her holpen for pity, And in the sign of Taurus men may see The stones ...
— Chaucer • Adolphus William Ward

... his eyes flashing and his clenched fist striking in the air—"What sort of combatants are these of the British Navy who refuse to read our war-books? The Kaiser's Heligoland speech! They never read a word of it. The Furchtbarkeit-Proklamation of August,—they never looked at it. The Reichstags-Rede with the printed picture of the Kaiser shaking hands with everybody,—they used it to wrap up sandwiches! What are they, then, Jellicoe and his men? They sit there in their ships and they read nothing! ...
— Moonbeams From the Larger Lunacy • Stephen Leacock

... Chamberlain was blunt and true, and sturdily said he— 'Abide, my lord, and rule your own, and take this rede from me, That woman's faith's a brittle trust. Seven twelve- months didst thou say? I'll pledge me for no lady's truth beyond the seventh day.'" —Ballad of the ...
— Frank Fairlegh - Scenes From The Life Of A Private Pupil • Frank E. Smedley

... bring with me flame and steel from out the wild-wood. When he shall see the night sky aflame, then shall he know I am at work, and when by day he heareth of death sudden and swift, then shall he know I am not idle. Bid him rede me this riddle: That bringing from chaos order, so from order will I bring chaos, that order peradventure shall remain. Haste you into Bourne, Roger, and ...
— Beltane The Smith • Jeffery Farnol

... is this damsel?" He replied, "Of a truth, I bought her for the sake of the little one on her arm; for know that, when she groweth up, there will not be her like for beauty, either in the land of the Arabs or the Ajams." His wife remarked, "Right was thy rede", and said to the woman "What is thy name?" She replied, "O my lady, my name is Tauflik.[FN3]" "And what is thy daughter's name?" asked she? Answered the slave, "Sa'ad, the happy." Rejoined her mistress; "Thou sayst sooth, thou art indeed happy, and happy is he who hath ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 4 • Richard F. Burton

... believeth thee and she must be in her dotage." Whereupon Lady Zubaydah cried out at him and in very sooth she was enraged with him and with his speech and shed tears. Then said the Caliph to her, "I lie and my eunuch lieth, and thou liest and thy waiting-woman lieth; so 'tis my rede we go, all four of us together, that we may see which of us telleth the truth." Masrur said, "Come, let us go, that I may do to this ill-omened old woman evil deeds[FN76] and deal her a sound drubbing for her lying." And the duenna answered ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... great and kings? What wight is it that can shape remedy Against these falsely proposed things? Who can the craft such craftes to espy But man? whose wit is e'er ready to apply To thing that sowning is into falshede? Woman! beth'ware of false men! I thee rede. ...
— Fifteenth Century Prose and Verse • Various

... mustache and plucks his hoary beard, Answering his nephew neither yea nor nay. The Franks keep silence—all save Ganelon Who rose and stood before the King, and spake Bold words and haughty:—"Put not faith in fools, Nor me nor others; follow your own rede! Since King Marsile makes offer to become Your man, with hands joined; furthermore will hold Spain as a fief from you; yea, will receive Our law as his law, he who counsel gives Such proffer to reject, cares not a whit What death we die. No counsel ...
— La Chanson de Roland • Lon Gautier

... the sacred rede,[438] Hark how the testimony of my truth Sounds heavenly music with an angel's hand, To testify Dunstan's integrity, And prove thy ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VIII (4th edition) • Various

... somme knyghtes used in tho dayes by whyche they came to honour & how they that were vycious were punysshed & ofte put to shame & rebuke, humbly byseching al noble lordes & ladyes wyth al other estates of what estate or degree they been of, that shal see & rede in this sayd book & werke, that they take the good & honest actes in their remembraunce & to folowe the same. Wherein they shalle fynde many joyous & playsaunt hystoryes & noble & renomed actes of humanyte gentylnesse & chyualryes. For ...
— The English Novel in the Time of Shakespeare • J. J. Jusserand

... the World's a Stage,' a popular medley written by Mr. L. Rede, and sung by Mrs. Kelley in the Frolic ...
— Charles Dickens and Music • James T. Lightwood

... up to her, and told her there was a Leith merchant looking for her. "And, Custy," said he, "there's plenty wind getting up, your fish will be sair hashed; put them off your hands, I rede ye." ...
— Christie Johnstone • Charles Reade

... be other than sleepy, finish for us thy tale that we may cut short the watching of this our latter night!" She replied, "With love and good will!" It hath reached me, O auspicious King, the director, the right-guiding, lord of the rede which is benefiting and of deeds fair-seeming and worthy celebrating, that the Prince went forward to the Palace gate and purposed to enter, but they forbade him nor availed he to go in; so he returned to his tents and there spent the night till dawn. ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... German waiter thinking to please the English guests had put the first sheet of the "Frankfurter Zeitung" in a prominent position to console them for the many defeats we are supposed to have had. John Burns' speech at the Albert Hall is reported in full in the German newspapers, headed "Eine Rede des ehemaligen Englischen Minister, John Burns. England gegen seine wahren interessen" (a speech of the former English minister,[2] John Burns. England against her true interests). No passports yet! No ...
— A War-time Journal, Germany 1914 and German Travel Notes • Harriet Julia Jephson

... drede, they bene so double in her falshede: For they in heart can think ene thing, and fain another in her speaking: and what was sweet and apparent, is smaterlich, and eke yshent. and when of service you have nede, pardie he will not rein nor rede. but when the Symnel it is eten, her ...
— A Learned Dissertation on Dumpling (1726) • Anonymous

... astate and degree/ J haue purposed to enprynte it/ shewyng therin the figures of suche persons as longen to the playe. Jn whom al astates and degrees ben comprysed/ besechyng al them that this litel werke shal see/ here/ or rede to have me for excused for the rude & symple makyng and reducyn in to our englisshe/ And where as is defaute to correcte and amende/ and in so doyng they shal deserve meryte and thanke/ and I shal pray for them/ that god of his grete mercy ...
— Game and Playe of the Chesse - A Verbatim Reprint Of The First Edition, 1474 • Caxton

... rede me, rede me, brother dear, Throughout Merry England, Where will I find a messenger, Betwixt us two to send. ...
— Peveril of the Peak • Sir Walter Scott

... saftige Triebe Gras und Chrueter uf, es stoehn in frischere Gstalte Farbigi Blueemli do, und d' Immli choemmen und suge. 'S Wasserstelzli chunnt, und lueg doch,'s Wuli vo Todtnau! Alles will di bschauen, und Alles will di bigruesse, Und di fruendlig Herz git alle fruendligi Rede: 'Choemmet ihr ordlige Thierli, do hender, esset und trinket! Witers goht mi Weg, Gsegott, ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 9, No. 54, April, 1862 • Various

... made a translacion Of a boke which is called Trophe In Lumbarde tonge, as men may rede and se, And in our vulgar, long or that he deyde, Gave it the name of Troylous ...
— Notes & Queries, No. 19, Saturday, March 9, 1850 • Various

... person what paths he followed in his journeyings after the truth—in his quest for a panacea for the ills and delusions of life. For, call it what he would—Biblical criticism, scientific inquiry—this was his aim first and last. He was trying to pierce the secret of existence—to rede the riddle that has never been solved.—What am I? Whence have I come? Whither am I going? What meaning has the pain I suffer, the evil that men do? Can evil be included in God's scheme?—And it was well, he told himself, as he pressed ...
— Australia Felix • Henry Handel Richardson

... waiting-woman of Medb's, Lochu by name, went to get water, and a great troop of women with her. Cuchulainn thought it was Medb. He threw two stones from Cuince, so that he slew her in her plain(?). Hence is Ath Rede Locha ...
— The Cattle-Raid of Cualnge (Tain Bo Cualnge) • Unknown

... The King of Navarre dissolved in humble protestations and repentant speeches over the assassination of the Constable Charles of Spain. "Go, traitor, go," answered John: "you will need to learn good rede or some infamous trick to escape from me." The young Duke of Normandy had thrown himself at the feet of the king his father, crying, "Ah! my lord, for God's sake have mercy; you do me dishonor; for what will be said ...
— A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times - Volume II. of VI. • Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot

... Asur[FN9] and Naynawah,[FN10] there was a Sage, Haykar hight, Grand Wazir of that Sovran and his chief secretary, and he was a grandee of abundant opulence and ampliest livelihood: ware was he and wise, a philosopher, and endowed with lore and rede and experience. Now he had interwedded with threescore wives, for each and every of which he had builded in his palace her own bower; natheless he had not a boy to tend, and was he sore of sorrow therefor. ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 6 • Richard F. Burton

... literature devoted to the Mysteries stands in no relation whatever (gar keinem Verhaltniss) to the importance in reality attached to them."[7] Later in the same connection, after quoting Clement of Alexandria's dictum "Geheime Dinge wie die Gottheit, werden der Rede anvertraut, nicht der Schrift," he adds, "Schriftliche Fixierung ist schon beinahe Entweihung."[8] A just remark which it would be well if certain critics who make a virtue of refusing to accept as evidence anything short of a direct and positive literary statement ...
— From Ritual to Romance • Jessie L. Weston

... hearkened to his mother's rede and going out forthright to the Divan, committed the manage of the realm into the hands of certain old men of understanding and experience; save that he did this only after Bassora had been ruined, inasmuch as he turned not from his folly till he had spent and squandered ...
— Alaeddin and the Enchanted Lamp • John Payne

... myrth in measure, is a pleasaunt thyng, To wryte and to rede well, be gyftes of learnyng; Remember this well, all you that be young, Exercise vertue, and rule well your ...
— A Mother's List of Books for Children • Gertrude Weld Arnold

... nothing but a Fool! Come away, on thy road be gone And put my rede to use: Leave all our swans for the future alone And seek thyself, gander, ...
— Stories of the Wagner Opera • H. A. Guerber

... instance, that Gottfried von Strasburg makes an attack on Wolfram von Eschenbach. And generally the best attitude is that of an editor of the said Gottfried (who himself rather fails to reck his own salutary rede by proceeding to redistribute the ordinary attribution of poems), "Ich bekenne dass ich in diesen Dingen skeptischer ...
— The Flourishing of Romance and the Rise of Allegory - (Periods of European Literature, vol. II) • George Saintsbury

... over (beyond) measure, The marrying for the young lede (people); Most sweet is it, I say yet (once more), When (as) it goes with the rede (counsel) of the elders. But otherwise it tends to a plague, As I saw on (by the example ...
— A Handbook of the English Language • Robert Gordon Latham

... or Kydde and smyte hem on pecys rawe. and frye hem in white grece. take raysouns of Coraunce and fry hem take oynouns parboile hem and hewe hem small and fry hem. take rede wyne suger with powdour of peper. of gynger of canel. salt. and cast erto. and lat it see with a gode quantite of white grece ...
— The Forme of Cury • Samuel Pegge

... We rede also that there are in Inde men with one eye and no mo. And certein so notably eared that thei hange downe to their hieles with suche a largenesse that they may lye in either of them as vpon a pallet: and soharde, that thei may rende vp trees with them. Some others ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries - Vol. II • Richard Hakluyt

... Lectures. For the rest, "The Queen of the Air" is marked by its statement, more clearly than before in Ruskin's writing, of the dependence of moral upon physical life, and of physical upon moral science. He speaks with respect of the work of Darwin and Tyndall; but as formerly in the Rede Lecture, and afterwards in the "Eagle's Nest," he claims that natural science should not be pursued as an end in itself, paramount to all other conclusions and considerations; but as a department of study subordinate to ethics, with a view ...
— The Life of John Ruskin • W. G. Collingwood

... von einer allgemeinen Weltliteratur die Rede und zwar nicht mit Unrecht: denn die saemmtlichen Nationen, in den fuerchterlichsten Kriegen durcheinander geschuettelt, sodann wieder auf sich selbst einzeln zurueckgefuehrt, hatten zu bemerken, dass sie manches ...
— The Life of Friedrich Schiller - Comprehending an Examination of His Works • Thomas Carlyle

... to read is Ichabod Crane, it is an grate book and I like to rede it. Ichabod Crame was a man and a man wrote a book and it is called Ichabod Crane i like it because the man called it ichabod crane when I read it for it is such ...
— How to Teach • George Drayton Strayer and Naomi Norsworthy

... mitre, the gift of John de Belemains, Prebendary of Chiswick, and a rich pastoral staff for the use of the Boy-Bishop. At York Minster were kept a "cope of tissue" for the Boy-Bishop, and ten for his attendants, while an inventory made in 1536 at Lincoln refers to "a coope of rede velvett with rolles and clowdes ordeyned for the barne bisshop with this scripture THE HYE WAY IS BEST." Typical of many other places, the custom was observed at Winchester, Durham, Salisbury, and Exeter Cathedrals; ...
— The Customs of Old England • F. J. Snell

... Corvinus's letter reads, in part, as follows: "O mi Philippe, o, inquam, Philippe noster, rede per immortalem Christum ad pristinum candorem, ad pristinam sinceritatem ad pristinam constantiam! Ne languescito ista tua formidine ac pusillanimitate nostrorum animos tantopere!... Non sis tantorum in ecclesia offendiculorum ...
— Historical Introductions to the Symbolical Books of the Evangelical Lutheran Church • Friedrich Bente

... threescore thousand dinars, and still there came no baggage, no, nor a burning plague.[FN38] At last folk began to clamour for their money and say, "The merchant Ma'aruf's baggage cometh not. How long will he take people's monies and give them to the poor?" And quoth one of them, "My rede is that we speak to Merchant Ali." So they went to him and said, "O Merchant Ali, Merchant Ma'aruf's baggage cometh not." Said he, "Have patience, it cannot fail to come soon." Then he took Ma'aruf aside and said ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 10 • Richard F. Burton

... side, A cavern stretches high and wide; A hundred entries thither lead; A hundred voices thence proceed, Each uttering forth the sibyl's rede. The sacred threshold now they trod: 'Pray for an answer! pray! the god,' She cries, 'the ...
— Michelangelo - A Collection Of Fifteen Pictures And A Portrait Of The - Master, With Introduction And Interpretation • Estelle M. Hurll

... fifty yards from the intrenchments he was perceived by the scouts of the insurgents, who promptly fired on the advancing troops. Thomas himself, Pasley (his aide-de-camp), Rede (the resident commissioner), and Racket (the stipendiary magistrate), all of whom were present at the attack, positively assert that the insurgents fired before a shot was discharged by the troops. Upon this reception Captain Thomas gave the order to fire, and the intrenchments were ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 17 • Charles Francis Horne

... author of the 'Ship of Fooles,' was issued from the press of Robert Coplande; and about 1527 Giles du Guez or du Wes (anglicized Dewes), French teacher to the Lady Mary, afterwards Queen Mary, published his 'Introductorie for to lerne to rede, to pronounce and to speke French trewly.' In addition to grammatical rules and dialogues, it contains a select vocabulary English and French. In 1514, Mary Tudor, younger sister of Henry VIII, became the unwilling bride of Louis XII of France. To initiate the princess ...
— The evolution of English lexicography • James Augustus Henry Murray

... as some ungracious pastors do, Show me the steep and thorny way to Heaven, Whilst, like a puffed and reckless libertine, Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads, And recks not his own rede. Hamlet, ...
— The World's Best Poetry — Volume 10 • Various

... without issue; and William Naunton (fil. 2^s). His son and heir, who married a Coke, had one daughter, Theophila, married to William Leman (ancestor of the family whose great estates are in search of an owner): their only issue, Theophila, married Thomas Rede, who thereby became possessed of Letheringham in Suffolk, and the whole of the Naunton property. His estates went to his son Robert, who, dying without issue in 1822, left them much diminished to his nephew, the Rev. Robert Rede Cooper, second son of the Rev. Samuel Lovick Cooper ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 204, September 24, 1853 • Various

... this relation some one has written, "you that rede this underwritten assure yourselfe that yt is a shamfull lye, for Talbot neither studied for any such thinge nor shewed himselfe dishonest in any thinge." Dr. Dee has thus commented upon it:— "This is Mr. Talbot or that lerned man, his own writing in my boke, very ...
— The Private Diary of Dr. John Dee - And the Catalog of His Library of Manuscripts • John Dee

... same nation with the Finnas or Laplanders, mentioned in the voyage of Ohthere, so named because using scriden, schreiten, or snowshoes. The Finnas or Laplanders were distinguished by the geographer of Ravenna into Scerde-fenos, and Rede-fenos, the Scride-finnas, and Ter-finnas of Alfred. So late as 1556, Richard Johnson, Hakluyt, ed. 1809. I. 316. mentions the Scrick-finnes as a wild ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 1 • Robert Kerr

... the countesse, so much was in his thought, That he nuste none other wit, ne he ne might for shame Tell it but a privy knight, Ulfyn was his name, That he truste most to. And when the knight heard thia, 'Sir,' he said, 'I ne can wit, what rede hereof is, For the castle is so strong, that the lady is in, For I ween all the land ne should it myd strengthe win. For the sea goeth all about, but entry one there n'is, And that is up on harde rocks, and so narrow way it is, That ...
— Specimens with Memoirs of the Less-known British Poets, Complete • George Gilfillan

... this, for he is not worthy that thy Highness give his daughter to a fellow whom none knoweth what he may be." "By what means," enquired the Sultan, "shall we put off the man when I pledged my promise; and the word of the Kings is their bond?" Replied the Wazir, "O my lord, my rede is that thou demand of him forty platters made of pure sand-gold[FN154] and full of gems (such as the woman brought thee aforetime), with forty white slave-girls to carry the platters and forty black eunuch-slaves." The King rejoined, ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... first voyage to the Western Isles, in July 1494. He obtained two charters, under the Great Seal, of the King's fortress of Ardcardane, and some lands near Tarbert, in North Kintyre, dated 15th September 1498, and 27th August 1499, in which he is designated "Adam Rede de Sterquhite." The service annexed to the first grant included the maintenance of six archers sufficiently provided with bows and arrows, upon occasion of the King's curbing the inhabitants of the Isles, who had long set the royal authority at defiance: "Neenon ...
— The Works of John Knox, Vol. 1 (of 6) • John Knox

... saint for Siward son of Beorn," said the old man hastily; "let me not have a cow's death, but a warrior's; die in my mail of proof, axe in hand, and helm on head. And such may be my death, if Edward the King reads my rede and grants ...
— Harold, Complete - The Last Of The Saxon Kings • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... of the contentious quarrel between the two Irish earls did not make the way to cause these lines to pass my hand, this gibberish should hardly have cumbered your eyes; but warned by my former fault, and dreading worser hap to come, I rede you take good heed that the good subjects lost state be so revenged that I hear not the rest be won to a right bye way to breed more traitor's stocks, and so the goal is gone. Make some difference between tried, just, and false friend. Let the good service of well-deservers be never ...
— Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth • Lucy Aikin

... as to the merits of Spinoza, though he was a man excommunicated by the Jews, to whom he belonged, and denounced by the Christians as a man little better than an atheist. "The Great Spirit of the world," says Schleiermacher, in his REDE UBER DIE RELIGION, "penetrated the holy but repudiated Spinoza; the Infinite was his beginning and his end; the universe his only and eternal love. He was filled with religion and religious feeling: ...
— Character • Samuel Smiles

... rede was good, And, turning on the poor hen, He clapt his hands, and stamped, and shooed, Hunting the exile tow'rd the wood, To house with ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell • James Lowell

... Europe, and all the lands, British and German—Norway's sands, Dutchland and Irish—the hireling bands Bought for butchery—recking no rede, But, flocking like vultures, with felon hands, To fatten the rage ...
— War Poetry of the South • Various

... Mexican knives—the garb of 'bouncers' in those days—jumped the second hole of the Britishers, dismantled the windlass, and Godamn'd as fast as the Britishers cursed in the colonial style. The excitement was awful. Commissioner Rede was fetched to settle the dispute. An absurd and unjust regulation was then the law; no party was allowed to have an interest in two claims at one and the same time, which was called 'owning two claims.' The Yankees carried the day. I, a living witness, do assert that, from that day, there was ...
— The Eureka Stockade • Carboni Raffaello

... dayes of the Kyng Arthour, Of which that Britons speken greet honour, Al was this land fulfild of fayerye. The elf-queene with hir joly companye Daunced ful ofte in many a grene mede; This was the olde opinion, as I rede. I speke of manye hundred yeres ago; But now kan no ...
— Outlines of English and American Literature • William J. Long

... J. J. Exegetische Reimen-Probe, ueber die Letzte Rede unsers Herrn Jesu Christi an Seine Wahrhaftige Juenger, etc., begriffen, abgefasset und mitgetheilet in Einfaltigem Liebes Gehorsam. Neu aufgelegt im Jahr 1860. Eben-Ezer, bei Buffalo, N. Y. (Exegetical Rhymes concerning the Last ...
— The Communistic Societies of the United States • Charles Nordhoff

... Rede of the Lord. And the Lord put forth His hand and caused it to touch my mouth, and the Lord said to me, Lo, I have set My ...
— Jeremiah • George Adam Smith

... humbled. On a wedlock he is bent Whereof the fateful offspring shall one day Hurl him from sovereignty to nothingness, And so fulfil the curse old Chronos spake, When from his immemorial throne he fell. And this his doom how to escape not one Of all the gods can rede him saving I. But to me all is known. Then let him sit Triumphant while his thunders roll through heaven, And his hand grasps the flaming thunderbolt; All his artillery shall not save its lord From utter shame and ruin ...
— Specimens of Greek Tragedy - Aeschylus and Sophocles • Goldwin Smith

... olde dayes of the King Arthour, Of which that Britons speken greet honour, Al was this land fulfild of fayerye. The elf-queen, with hir joly companye, Daunced ful ofte in many a grene mede; This was the olde opinion, as I rede. But now can no man see none elves mo. For now the grete charitee and prayeres Of ...
— Among Famous Books • John Kelman

... James of Douglas, mark my rede! That heart shall pass once more In fiery fight against the foe, As ...
— Lays of the Scottish Cavaliers and Other Poems • W.E. Aytoun

... other; so it is my counsel that we make our escape, whilst all eyes sleep, and flee to King Ya'arub bin Kahtan,[FN20] for that he hath more of men and is stronger of reign." They, hearing his advice exclaimed "Right is thy rede," whereupon he bade them kindle fires at their tent-doors and march under cover of the night. They did his bidding and set out, so by daybreak they had already fared far away. As soon as it was morning ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 7 • Richard F. Burton

... cease not doing thus for a day or two days or even three days, so shalt thou have rest from toil and moil." When the Bull heard these words he knew the Ass to be his friend and thanked him, saying, "Right is thy rede;" and prayed that all blessings might requite him, and cried, "O Father Wakener![FN29] thou hast made up for my failings." (Now[FN30] the merchant, O my daughter, understood all that passed between them.) Next ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... where the master biddeth there will the dog go. It is well known this priest is but your instrument. I speak very freely; the time is not for courtesies. Even as I speak, so would I be answered. And answer get I none! Ye but put more questions. I rede ye beware, Sir Daniel; for in this way ye will but nourish and not ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 8 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... after the feastday of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, the daughter of the skies, the virgin moon being then in her first quarter, it came to pass that those learned judges repaired them to the halls of law. There master Courtenay, sitting in his own chamber, gave his rede and master Justice Andrews, sitting without a jury in the probate court, weighed well and pondered the claim of the first chargeant upon the property in the matter of the will propounded and final testamentary disposition ...
— Ulysses • James Joyce

... it, and to make these blind folk see its power. There is more to be done here to-night than the slaying of a steed, and a greater evil to be stayed than the shameful eating of meat sacrificed to idols. I have seen it in a dream. Here the cross must stand and be our rede." ...
— The Blue Flower, and Others • Henry van Dyke

... properly, of course we should have been going to the Giant's Causeway and the swinging Bridge at Carrick-a-rede; but propriety is the last thing we aim at in our itineraries. We were within worshipping distance of two rather important shrines in our literary pilgrimage; for we had met a very knowledgeable traveller at the Sorley Boy, and after a little chat with him had ...
— Penelope's Irish Experiences • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... Grumkow; and sums up with this pithy reminiscence: "I remember always what, the King said to me at Wusterhausen, when your Royal Highness lay prisoner in the Castle of Custrin, and I wished to take your part: 'Nein Grumkow, denket an diese Stelle, Gott gebe dass ich nicht wahr rede, aber mein Sohn stirht nicht eines naturlichen Todes; und Gott gebe dass er nicht unter Henkers Hande komme. No, Grumkow, think of what I now tell you: God grant it do not come true,—but my Son won't die a natural death; God grant he do not come into the ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. IX. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... on this erthe . and ese to any soule, It is in cloistere or in score . be many skilles I fynde; For in cloistre cometh no man . to chide ne to fighte, But alle is buxolllllesse there and bokes . to rede and to lerne." Piers Plowman, B. ...
— Old English Libraries, The Making, Collection, and Use of Books • Ernest A. Savage



Words linked to "Rede" :   warn, press, deconstruct, dissuade, comment, urge, misadvise, urge on, exhort, misinterpret, misguide, tip, reinterpret, talk over, re-explain, explain, commentate, advise, hash out, tip off, annotate, propound, gloss, moralise, consult, counsel, interpret, moralize, discourage, discuss, explicate, contraindicate



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