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Loin   /lɔɪn/   Listen
Loin

noun
1.
A cut of meat taken from the side and back of an animal between the ribs and the rump.
2.
Either side of the backbone between the hipbone and the ribs in humans as well as quadrupeds.  Synonym: lumbus.



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"Loin" Quotes from Famous Books



... to the string and pointed downward, but ready for instant use. Diagonally across his body ran a cord supporting a quiver, from which the feathered shafts of several arrows projected above his left shoulder. Around his waist looped another cord from which dangled a small loin mat. Otherwise he was totally nude—a bronze statue ...
— The Pathless Trail • Arthur O. (Arthur Olney) Friel

... and scantiest kind—a hip-cloth swathing their bodies from waist to mid-thigh, closely akin to the "breech-clout" of the Northern Indian, only of a different material. Instead of dressed buckskin, the loin covering of the Chaco savage is a strip of white cotton cloth, some of wool in bands of bright colour having a very pretty effect. But, unlike their red brethren of the North, they know nought of either ...
— Gaspar the Gaucho - A Story of the Gran Chaco • Mayne Reid

... Whose thousand double turnings never met: His sleeves half hid with elbow pinionings, As if he meant to fly with linen wings. But when I look, and cast mine eyes below, What monster meets mine eyes in human show? So slender waist with such an abbot's loin, Did never sober nature sure conjoin. Lik'st a strawn scare-crow in the new-sown field, Reared on some stick, the tender corn to shield. Or if that semblance suit not every dale, Like a broad shake-fork with a slender steel Despised nature suit them ...
— Character Writings of the 17th Century • Various

... scald a little grated Bread in it, then put in three Eggs beaten, a little Flower, Currans, beaten Spice, Suet, Sugar and Salt, with some Beef Suet finely shred, make it pretty stiff, and wrap it in a Lambs Caul, and rost it on a Spit with a Loin of Lamb; if you please, you may ...
— The Queen-like Closet or Rich Cabinet • Hannah Wolley

... seasoned, and rubbed with lard; when it begins to brown, baste it with salt and water; a large loin will take from two to three hours to roast, the thin part of the fore-quarter an hour; it should be well done; boil up and thicken the gravy. A leg of veal or mutton may be stuffed before baking. Lamb and mutton do not require to be rubbed with lard, as they ...
— Domestic Cookery, Useful Receipts, and Hints to Young Housekeepers • Elizabeth E. Lea

... hour! The Lieutenant heard them coming—his orderly ran in with the word—and he was out in an instant with eight men. Eight soldiers armed with rifles. It was quite amusing. And opposed to them, that mob, in their peaked hats, in their loin cloths or their sarongs, bare to waist as usual. Poor fools! Fancy—not a gun among them! They thought they were invisible! The geomancer had told them that, and they believed him. Carried at their head a flag, some outlandish, homemade thing, with unknown characters ...
— Civilization - Tales of the Orient • Ellen Newbold La Motte

... loin quand la mre s'aperut de leur fuite. Elle ne pouvait pas les poursuivre, car elle avait des fers aux mains et aux pieds, mais elle dit son mari: "Allez chercher ...
— Contes et lgendes - 1re Partie • H. A. Guerber

... agahan and that it was made out of the bark of a tree whose name I can not recall. He described the process of beating the bark and promised to bring me, 60 days from the date of our conference, a loin cloth of one of these people. I inquired as to their manner of life, and was assured that they were tau-batag; that is, people who slept under logs or up in trees. He said that he and his people had killed many of them, but that ...
— The Manbos of Mindano - Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences, Volume XXIII, First Memoir • John M. Garvan

... que vous craindrez que le mouvement de cette grande machine ne fasse sur vous l'effet de Gulliver, qui, lorsqu'il deplacait sa jambe, ecrasait les Lilliputiens. Exhortez-vous, devancez le temps, agrandissez votre imagination, regardez de loin, et vous verrez que ces grands personnages que vous croyez violents, cruels, que sais-je? ne sont que des politiques. Ils se connaissent, se jugent mieux que vous, et, quand ils sont reellement habiles, ils savent se rendre ...
— Machiavelli, Volume I - The Art of War; and The Prince • Niccolo Machiavelli

... people have infinitely less affection than many savage beasts of my acquaintance. I have seen a mother bear, galled by frequent shots, obstinately meet her death by repeatedly returning under fire whilst endeavouring to rescue her young from the grasp of intruding men. But here, for a simple loin-cloth or two, human mothers eagerly exchanged their little offspring, delivering them into perpetual bondage to my Beluch soldiers."—Speke, pp. 234,5. For the sake of the little story of "a bear mother," Speke made a general assertion on ...
— The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death, Volume II (of 2), 1869-1873 • David Livingstone

... to wander, Stand mountain-giants, both here and yonder, The loin of one by the other's shoulder, Naught else to where earth and sky are blending. The dread of a world's din daunts the beholder; The silence ...
— Poems and Songs • Bjornstjerne Bjornson

... o'th' Damems, an' Will o'th' Gooise Coit, An' th' lads at wur in that puddin exploit, Thare wur Ned daan fra Oakworth, an' Ike fra Loin-ends, Along wi thair aristocratical friends, They repaired to Black Bull, of saand puddin' to dine, That day at thay oppen'd th' Worth ...
— Th' History o' Haworth Railway - fra' th' beginnin' to th' end, wi' an ackaant o' th' oppnin' serrimony • Bill o'th' Hoylus End

... brilliant color, a fascinating spectacle. Tramp, tramp, tramping along the road, in singles, couples, groups, and gangs, you have the working-man and the working-woman—but not clothed like ours. Usually the man is a nobly-built great athlete, with not a rag on but his loin-handkerchief; his color a deep dark brown, his skin satin, his rounded muscles knobbing it as if it had eggs under it. Usually the woman is a slender and shapely creature, as erect as a lightning-rod, and she has ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... Le portrait va plus loin que ma pensee.—A. de Tocqueville. The picture expresses more ...
— Correspondence & Conversations of Alexis de Tocqueville with Nassau William Senior from 1834 to 1859, Vol. 2 • Alexis de Tocqueville

... cliff-dwellers downtown. They probably wear loin cloths of a fashionable cut," she laughed back ...
— Bambi • Marjorie Benton Cooke

... yet not impure," description of his sensations: "J'ai dit qu'il y avoit loin de l'Hermitage a Eaubonne; je passois par les coteaux d'Andilly qui sont charmans. Je revois en marchant a celle que j'allois voir, a l'accueil caressant qu'elle me feroit, au baiser qui m'attendoit a mon arrivee. Ce seul baiser, ce baiser funeste avant meme de le recevoir, ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 2 • George Gordon Byron

... sloe, with ear not low, With horse's breast, with depth of chest, With breadth of loin, and curve in groin And nape set far behind the head— Such were the dogs that ...
— Anecdotes of Dogs • Edward Jesse

... il n'a rien manque a votre gloire, pas meme une apparence d'oubli. Des triomphes des autres vous n'avez recueilli que les rayons extremes: ceux qui ont franchi la cime des arcs de triomphe pour aller au loin, coups egares de la grande ...
— Gallipoli Diary, Volume I • Ian Hamilton

... time,—since my days of Parisian life,—the terrible storming youth, afterwards renowned as Leon Michel Gambetta, had startled the quiet guests with his noisy eloquence, till the old habitues spilled their coffee, and the red-capped students said to each other, "Il ira loin, ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... was undoubtedly possessed of that invaluable secret; at least, he was never known to betray the faintest symptom of transport, except one evening at the club, where he observed, with some demonstrations of vivacity, that he had dined upon a delicate loin of veal. ...
— The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, Volume I • Tobias Smollett

... body, the arms are badly attached at the shoulders. Furthermore the hands, besides being very badly drawn, have in this instance the appearance of being mismated with the arms, while both feet look like right feet. The dress consists of the usual loin-cloth and of a thin, transparent over-garment, indicated only by a line in front and below. Now surely no one will maintain that these methods and others of like sort which there is no opportunity here to illustrate are the ...
— A History Of Greek Art • F. B. Tarbell

... their guard against it. He hesitated to try it here from the fact that his supple opponent was so slightly clothed there was but little upon which to get much of a grip. All these Indian lads had stripped to their moccasins, leggings, and loin cloths, while Frank had only taken off his coat and vest. However, as Frank was not able to succeed in other ways he determined to try it, but to insure success he must not let his opponent have any suspicion ...
— Three Boys in the Wild North Land • Egerton Ryerson Young

... him: I now would give My love could he but live Who lately lived for me, and when he found 'T was vain, in holy ground He hid his face amid the shades of death! I waste for him my breath Who wasted his for me! but mine returns, And this loin bosom burns With stifling heat, heaving it up in sleep, And waking me to weep Tears that had melted his soft heart. For years Wept he as bitter tears! MERCIFUL GOD! such was his latest prayer, THESE MAY SHE NEVER SHARE! ...
— Citation and Examination of William Shakspeare • Walter Savage Landor

... cleared a way through the multitude to the pyramid and now the Earthlings could see a score of chained men and women, nude save for loin cloths and obviously captives. ...
— Adaptation • Dallas McCord Reynolds

... which Meyerbeer, however, declares to be false in a letter addressed to Veron, the director of the Opera:—"L'orgue a ete paye par vous, fourni par vous, comme toutes les choses que reclamait la mise en scene de Robert, et je dois declarer que loin de vous tenir au strict neccessaire, vous avez depasse de bcaucoup les obligations ordinaires d'un directeur envers ...
— Frederick Chopin as a Man and Musician - Volume 1-2, Complete • Frederick Niecks

... duty now, these three men braced up loin, and sailed to execute the same accordingly. For invaders and defenders were by this time in real earnest with their work, and sure alike of having done the very best that could be done. With equal confidence on either side, a noble triumph was expected, while the ...
— Mary Anerley • R. D. Blackmore

... d'accords touchants, De doux chants, La colombe gemissante Me demande par pitie Sa moitie Sa moitie loin d'elle absente!" ...
— Thelma • Marie Corelli

... O'Mino sought out little missions for him to perform, out of the line of his usual duties, and well rewarded in coin. This was at his first appearance in the house. Then she grew bolder. Densuke found his clothing undergoing mysterious repairs and replacement. His washing, even down to the loin cloths, was undertaken by the Ojo[u]san. Densuke did not dare to question or thwart her. Any trifling fault O'Mino took on herself, as due to her meddling. She became bolder and bolder, and sought his assistance in her own duties, until finally they were as man and maid employed in ...
— The Yotsuya Kwaidan or O'Iwa Inari - Tales of the Tokugawa, Volume 1 (of 2) • James S. De Benneville

... short, a black or blue wig, dressed with much skill, was substituted for it; ostrich feathers waved on the heads of warriors, and a large lock, flattened behind the right ear, distinguished the military or religious chiefs from their subordinates. When the art of weaving became common, a belt and loin-cloth of white linen replaced the leathern garment. Fastened round the waist, but so low as to leave the navel uncovered, the loin-cloth frequently reached to the knee; the hinder part was frequently drawn between the ...
— History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 1 (of 12) • G. Maspero

... entendre les difficultez qu'ilz trouvent de faire demeurer ceste couronne a son dict filz, au cas que la royne sa femme allast de vie a trespaz sans enfans, et d'aultant qu'ilz ont congneu la volunte de ceulx cy estre bien loin de leur intention; et pour ce scavoir par quelz moyens il semblera bon audict Empereur qu'on puisse mettre cela en termes devant la fin ...
— The Reign of Mary Tudor • James Anthony Froude

... Captain (so that Jacques must have died hard, thought I), and such a raffle of arms and legs and swollen up-turn'd faces as they made I defy you to picture. For they were pack'd close as herrings; and the hut was fill'd up with their horses, ready saddled, and rubbing shoulder to loin, so narrow was the room. It needed the open window to give them air: and even so, 'twas ...
— The Splendid Spur • Arthur T. Quiller Couch

... too, he would rub his hands together as if in eager expectation, and would chuckle to himself as he glanced seaward. Of his own accord he gave orders to Sooka to get both the surf-boats ready for launching, and to make the boys put on their newest loin-cloths; and then, when everything was in readiness, he asked Bransome if he was going ...
— Stories by English Authors: Africa • Various

... very keen on imparting to us a variety of knowledge. So at home we had to go through much more than what was required by the school course. We had to get up before dawn and, clad in loin-cloths, begin with a bout or two with a blind wrestler. Without a pause we donned our tunics on our dusty bodies, and started on our courses of literature, mathematics, geography and history. On our return from school our drawing ...
— My Reminiscences • Rabindranath Tagore

... et ne vois dans ce monde Que ma douleur qui n'ait point de sejour Ou s'abriter sur ta rive profonde Et s'endormir sous tes yeux loin du jour; Je vais toujours cherchant au bord de l'onde Le sang du beau ...
— Poems & Ballads (Second Series) - Swinburne's Poems Volume III • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... I know that Lisa always takes up with any kind of nonsense. She scents nonsense. Elle flaire cela de loin.[18] ...
— The Light Shines in Darkness • Leo Tolstoy

... Palestine, Herr Landberg, writes, "La plume refuserait son service, la langue serait insuffisante, si celui qui connait la vie de tous les jours des Orientaux, surtout des classes elevees, voulait la devoiler. L'Europe est bien loin d'en avoir ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 10 • Richard F. Burton

... dark— Is it his mother?—and cry: "Lo, what is this that comes, Haunting, troubling still, Even in our heights, our homes, The wild Maids of the Hill? What flesh bare this child? Never on woman's breast Changeling so evil smiled; Man is he not, but Beast! Loin-shape of the wild, Gorgon-breed of ...
— Hippolytus/The Bacchae • Euripides

... up, and looked in every now and then to see if Pelle were finished. When he licked his horn spoon clean and threw it into the drawer, she came in with something on a plate: they had had roast loin ...
— Pelle the Conqueror, Complete • Martin Andersen Nexo

... stepped out of the cage, gathered a handful of grass and a small stick and returning, jammed the grass into Rabba Kega's mouth, laid the stick crosswise between his teeth and fastened it there with the thong from Rabba Kega's loin cloth. Now could the witch-doctor but roll his eyes and ...
— Jungle Tales of Tarzan • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... or the fat from around the kidneys and loin of beef is also tried out and used for cooking. All scraps of fat—cooked or uncooked—as well as any drippings from beef, veal, pork, and chicken, should be saved and used in cooking. The fat from mutton has a peculiar flavor and so cannot be used in food, ...
— School and Home Cooking • Carlotta C. Greer

... himself that the camp would not break till morning, slunk away into the shadows. He had failed again; but his hate had made him strong. He was naked except for a loin clout. His beard and hair were matted, the latter hanging over his eyes. His body was smeared with ashes. Not even Ahmed would have recognized him a yard off. He had something less than nine hours to reach the cape before they did; and it was necessary that he should have accomplices. ...
— The Adventures of Kathlyn • Harold MacGrath

... Saint Jean-Baptiste, ou la riviere de Saint Jean faisant du haut d'un rocher fort eleve une terrible cascade dans un abime, forme un brouillard qui derobe l'eau a la veue, et fait un bruit qui avertit de loin les navigateurs de ...
— Glimpses of the Past - History of the River St. John, A.D. 1604-1784 • W. O. Raymond

... experts. Officials of the Bureau of Animal Industry claim that before long we will partake of antelope steak. For the antelope has been found to be particularly adapted to the more arid western sections of the country. And beyond that the gastronomist of the future will have to reckon with loin of hippopotamus! ...
— Three Acres and Liberty • Bolton Hall

... she was never able quite to destroy. There had been talk of a banquet to a visiting celebrity the night before, for which the menu was one of unusual costliness. Mr. Milbrey had dwelt with feeling upon certain of its eminent excellences, such as loin of young bear, a la Granville, and the boned quail, ...
— The Spenders - A Tale of the Third Generation • Harry Leon Wilson

... dear boy, I'm delighted to see you, only I wish you hadn't come just now;—and you too, Mr. Fairlegh—and such a small loin of mutton for dinner; but I'm so glad to see you—looking like a ghost, so pale and thin," she added, shaking me warmly by the hand; "but what I am to do about it, or to say to him when he comes back—only I'm not a prophet to guess things before they happen—and if I did I should always be ...
— Frank Fairlegh - Scenes From The Life Of A Private Pupil • Frank E. Smedley

... sorts of good smells, seem like sighs issuing from its mouth-like doors. The smell of the preparation of all kinds of foods and sauces makes me smack my lips. And here, again, is a butcher's boy washing a mess of chitterlings as if it were an old loin-cloth. The cook is preparing every kind of food. Sweetmeats are being constructed, cakes are being baked. [To himself.] I wonder if I am to get a chance to wash my feet and an invitation to eat what I can hold. [He looks in another direction.] There are courtezans ...
— The Little Clay Cart - Mrcchakatika • (Attributed To) King Shudraka

... chlorodyne with a piece of harmless fuse projecting can fool anybody. It fooled Bertie, and it fooled the natives. When Captain Hansen lighted the fuse and hooked the fish-hook into the tail-end of a native's loin-cloth, that native was smitten with so ardent a desire for the shore that he forgot to shed the loin-cloth. He started for'ard, the fuse sizzling and spluttering at his rear, the natives in his path taking headers over the barbed wire at every jump. Bertie ...
— Great Sea Stories • Various

... Anglais qui a porte le plus loin la gloire du theatre comique est feu M. Congreve. Il n'a fait que peu de pieces, mais toutes sont excellentes dans leur genre.... Vous y voyez partout le langage des honnetes gens avec des actions de fripon; ce qui prouve qu'il ...
— Henry Esmond; The English Humourists; The Four Georges • William Makepeace Thackeray

... the loin, rump, round, tenderloin or fillet of beef, leg and flank. The loin is usually cut into roasts and steaks; the roasts are called sirloin roasts and the steaks sirloin or porter-house steaks. In the loin is found the tenderloin; ...
— Miss Parloa's New Cook Book • Maria Parloa

... girl, thirteen at most; her small flat breasts were those of a child, her narrow shoulders and her narrow loin spoke of scanty food and privation of all kinds, and her arms and legs were brown from the play of the sun on their nakedness; they were little else than skin and bone, nerves and sinew, and looked like stakes of wood. ...
— The Waters of Edera • Louise de la Rame, a.k.a. Ouida

... to us as "the web and pin," it is a film which affects Arab horses in the damp hot regions of Malabar and Zanzibar and soon blinds them. This equine cataract combined with loin-disease compels men to ride ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 8 • Richard F. Burton

... the rage of one who expects a walk-over and receives a bad jolt instead, that old she-otter really got to work. She recoiled like a coiled snake, and the polecat felt fire in one loin. ...
— The Way of the Wild • F. St. Mars

... hooam to Ploo Croft loin, But what wor his surprise To find all th' neighbors standing aat, We oppen maaths an' eyes; "By gow!" sed Billy, to hissen, "This pig must be a prize!" An' th' wimmen cried, "Gooid gracious fowk! But isn't it ...
— Yorkshire Ditties, Second Series - To which is added The Cream of Wit and Humour - from his Popular Writings • John Hartley

... his second wife, Dorothea (Plate 5). These oil paintings, and the drawings for them, are now in the Basel Museum. And no one can examine them, remembering that the painter was but nineteen, without echoing the exclamation of a brilliant French writer: "Holbein ira beaucoup plus loin dans son art, mais deja il est superbe." These warm translucent browns are instinct ...
— Holbein • Beatrice Fortescue

... she reached low eaves that reached down like a jagged saw from utter blackness. Less than a minute later she was crawling monkeywise along a roof; before another five had passed she had dropped on all fours in the dust of the outer road and was running like a black ghost—head down—an end of her loin-cloth between her teeth—one arm held tight to her side and the other crooked outward, swinging—striding, ...
— Rung Ho! • Talbot Mundy

... bark-lashed to the large branches of the family tree. Over this there was a rude roof of long grass, which had a fairly intelligent slope. As a shelter from rain, the Jackoon house left much to be desired. The scanty loin cloths of the habitants knew no such thing as wash-day or line. With all its drawbacks, however, this habitation was far more adequate to the needs of its builders than the cold brush rabbit-forms of ...
— The Minds and Manners of Wild Animals • William T. Hornaday

... Roasted leg of mutton Baked leg of mutton Steaks of a leg of mutton To harrico mutton Mutton chops Boiled breast of mutton Breast of mutton in ragout To grill a breast of mutton Boiled shoulder of mutton Shoulder of mutton with celery sauce Roasted loin ...
— The Virginia Housewife • Mary Randolph

... celebrations. 'It began,' he remarks, 'in the evening at sunset. Numerous companies scattered here and there were singing, and uttering loud cries. While this was passing, the cannon of the castle was fired, and the people of the town launched into the air "bein haut et bein loin, une maniere de fue plus gros fellot que je veisse oncques allume." They told me they made use of such at sea, to set fire to the sails of an enemy's vessel. It seems to me that it is a thing easy to be made, and at a little expense it may be equally well employed to burn a camp or a ...
— James Cutbush - An American Chemist, 1788-1823 • Edgar F. Smith

... item the old dame prices the goods. The little group of young married women, with babies tied in a bundle behind them, or half-naked children clinging to their loin-cloths, nods approval. But Salam's face is a study. In place of contemptuous indifference there is now rising anger, terrible to behold. His brows are knitted, his eyes flame, his beard seems to bristle with rage. The tale of prices is hardly ...
— Morocco • S.L. Bensusan

... according to some Baghdad (?) and Baghistan a pagoda (?). Sprenger (Al-Mas'udi, p. 327) remarks that Baghfur is a literal translation of Tien-tse and quotes Visdelou, "pour mieux faire comprendre de quel ciel ils veulent parler, ils poussent la genealogie (of the Emperor) plus loin. Ils lui donnent le ciel pour pere, la terre pour mere, le soleil pour frere aine et ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 7 • Richard F. Burton

... expertise when it comes to good food; he would have told you about hearth-baked bread, with its golden brown crust, crunching tenderly between the teeth; of a smooth, full-bodied wine, fortified with a piquancy not too strong, of a loin of mutton improved with parsley, of a cut of specially-raised veal as long as this, white and delicate, and which is like an almond paste between the teeth, of partridges complimented by a surprisingly flavorful sauce, and, for ...
— The Middle Class Gentleman - (Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme) • Moliere

... people were in a "slaying" mood, being on the "war-path" and in arms against their own Government, and it has also been said that those particular Dyaks happened to be wearing trowsers instead of their ordinary chawat, or loin cloth, and, as their enemies, the Brunais, were trowser-wearers, the Trusan people thought fit to consider all natives wearing such extravagant clothing as their enemies. The Sarawak Government, on hearing of the incident, at once despatched Mr. ...
— British Borneo - Sketches of Brunai, Sarawak, Labuan, and North Borneo • W. H. Treacher

... Lamb cutlets, breaded. Oysters, fried in crumbs. Currie of Veal, in border of rice. Queen Fritters. Kidneys, champagne sauce. Pigeons, en compote. Sweetbreads, larded green peas. Roasts. Beef. Lamb, mint sauce. Loin of Veal, stuffed. Goose. Turkey. Chicken. Ham, champagne sauce. Vegetables. Mashed Potatoes, Boiled Potatoes. Boiled Rice. Baked Potatoes. Stewed Tomatoes. Squash. Turnips. Cabbage. Beans. Pastry. Sponge Cake ...
— Fifth Avenue • Arthur Bartlett Maurice

... hound, who stands doubtful, looking up at his master for advice. Look at the severity, delicacy, lightness of every curve. His head is finer than a deer's; his hind legs tense as steel springs; his fore-legs straight as arrows: and yet see the depth of chest, the sweep of loin, the breadth of paw, the mass of arm and thigh; and if you have an eye for form, look at the absolute majesty of his attitude at this moment. Majesty is the only word for it. If he were six feet high, instead of twenty-three inches, with what animal on earth could you compare him? Is it ...
— Prose Idylls • Charles Kingsley

... poles could not stand it for more than a minute at a time. A few yards from the end of the trench a large hole had been dug and filled with water. When all was ready, six men, ordinary coolies, dressed only in their "dholis," or loin-cloths, stepped out of the crowd, and, amidst tremendous excitement and a horrible noise of conches and drums, passed over the burning trench from end to end, in single file, at a quick walk, plunging one after the other into the water. Not one of them showed ...
— Modern Mythology • Andrew Lang

... following his natural instinct when he threw aside the chase and capture of Mhtoon Pah and burst into the cellar-room. It was small and close, and smelt of the foul, fruity atmosphere of mildew. The ceiling was low, and crouching in one corner was a small boy, clad only in a loin-cloth, who stared at them and screamed ...
— The Pointing Man - A Burmese Mystery • Marjorie Douie

... we shall have a change, eh, James?" and passing on, went up stairs. Ah, thought I, I hope so too, for I know what you mean. He soon came down; said my wife might get up if she liked, taking a little care, and, "after to-day, give her a pill every noon for dinner off a loin of mutton, eh, James? A few more broiled pills for her, and a pint less of liquor for you, and your old father and mother would soon come to life again. Your savings' bank is at the tavern, and the landlady of the Stag keeps your accounts, I believe, eh, James? I shall charge you ...
— Select Temperance Tracts • American Tract Society

... are, lithe of limb and broad of chest. Each brings a tangle of pots and kettles, bags and bales, but wears nothing throughout the fishery save a loin-cloth and now and then a turban denoting nationality or caste. There were forty-five hundred of them in 1905, and those from the Madras Presidency were the backbone of the enterprise. Nearly half the divers were registered from Kilakari, and hundreds came from the ...
— East of Suez - Ceylon, India, China and Japan • Frederic Courtland Penfield

... Mr. Blackstone, "that if the loin set before the king, whoever he was, had been boiled, be would never ...
— The Vicar's Daughter • George MacDonald

... — N. rear, back, posteriority; rear rank, rear guard; background, hinterland. occiput[Anat], nape, chine; heels; tail, rump, croup, buttock, posteriors, backside scut[obs3], breech, dorsum, loin; dorsal region, lumbar region; hind quarters; aitchbone[obs3]; natch, natch bone. stern, poop, afterpart[obs3], heelpiece[obs3], crupper. wake; train &c. (sequence) 281. reverse; other side of the shield. V. be behind &c. adv.; fall astern; bend backwards; ...
— Roget's Thesaurus

... de la possibilite de l'abandon de votre voyage en Crimee m'a bien tranquillisee parce qu'il y avait bien des causes d'alarmes en vous voyant partir si loin et expose a tant de dangers. Mais bien que l'absence de votre Majeste en Crimee soit toujours une grande perte pour les operations vigoureuses dont nous sommes convenus, j'espere que leur execution n'en sera pas moins vivement poussee par ...
— The Letters of Queen Victoria, Volume III (of 3), 1854-1861 • Queen of Great Britain Victoria

... the Holy Ghost moves a man's mind to do something, sometimes the latter understands the meaning of it, like Jeremias who hid his loin-cloth in the Euphrates (Jer. 13:1-11); while sometimes he does not understand it—thus the soldiers, who divided Christ's garments, understood not the meaning of ...
— Summa Theologica, Part II-II (Secunda Secundae) • Thomas Aquinas

... richer than it was before, as it is that China would not be richer if all the wealth of England and America were carried thither without allowing the Chinese labourers more than boiled rice for food and a loin-cloth for clothing. Just as in this case the English and American machinery would become mere useless old iron in China, so in the former case would our machinery in Europe or America. And just as the English and the Americans, if ...
— Freeland - A Social Anticipation • Theodor Hertzka

... ces hommes mes freres Le coeur brise d'un malheureux? Trop au-dessus de mes miseres, Mon infortune est si loin d'eux!" ...
— She and I, Volume 2 - A Love Story. A Life History. • John Conroy Hutcheson

... rear, back, posteriority; rear rank, rear guard; background, hinterland. occiput [Anat.], nape, chine; heels; tail, rump, croup, buttock, posteriors, backside scut^, breech, dorsum, loin; dorsal region, lumbar region; hind quarters; aitchbone^; natch, natch bone. stern, poop, afterpart^, heelpiece^, crupper. wake; train &c (sequence) 281. reverse; other side of the shield. V. be behind &c adv.; fall astern; bend backwards; bring up the rear. Adj. back, rear; hind, hinder, hindmost, ...
— Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases: Body • Roget

... de la faim, se repaissant de sa propre chair, est reduit a devorer la substance meme de son ame dans les horreurs de son desespoir. Et qu'imagine-t-il done pour echapper a lui-meme, comme a son plus cruel ennemi? Je ne dis pas: 'Ou ira-t-il loin de l'esprit de Dieu? ou fuira-t-il loin de sa face?' Je demande, ou ira-t-il loin de son propre esprit? ou fuira-t-il loin de sa propre face? Ou descendra-t-il qu'il ne s'y suive lui-meme; ou se cachera-t-il qu'il ne s'y trouve encore? Insense, dont la folie egale la misere, quand tu te seras tue, ...
— Richard Vandermarck • Miriam Coles Harris

... rash for one man, without his gun, to rob a wolf-pack of its kill! But the trapper wanted fresh moose-meat. Hastily and skilfully he began to cut from the carcass the choicest portions of haunch and loin. He had no more than fairly got to work when the far-off cry of the pack sounded on his expectant ears. He laboured furiously as the voices drew nearer. The interruption of the lynx he understood, in a measure, by the noises that reached him; but when the pack came hot on the trail ...
— The House in the Water - A Book of Animal Stories • Charles G. D. Roberts

... be a slow, tense crisping of every tiniest nerve in his body. It would begin as he lay in bed—counting interminably to get himself to sleep—between his knees and ankles, and thence slowly spread to every part of him, creeping upward, from loin to shoulder, in a gradual wave of torture that was not pain, yet infinitely worse. A dry, pringling aura as of billions of minute electric shocks crept upward over his flesh, till it reached his head, where ...
— The Pit • Frank Norris

... portals sound and pacing forth, With steps, alas! too slow, The college gips of high illustrious worth With all the dishes in long order go; In the midst, a form divine, Appears the fam'd Sir-loin; And soon with plums and glory crown'd, A mighty pudding sheds its sweets around. Heard ye the din of dinner bray? Knife to fork, and fork to knife: Unnumber'd heroes through the glorious strife, Through fish, flesh, pies, and puddings cut ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, No. 333 - Vol. 12, Issue 333, September 27, 1828 • Various

... who inhabited this part of Formosa, so much avoided on account of its dangerous coral reefs, wore only a blue loin-cloth. Their hair was adorned with a number of brightly-coloured feathers, while across the shoulder of each passed a strip of scarlet cloth, reaching to the waist, supporting a plaited loop, into which ...
— The Strand Magazine, Volume V, Issue 29, May 1893 - An Illustrated Monthly • Various

... mixed flavours; as to show why cabbage is reprehensible with roast beef, laudable with bacon; why the haunch of mutton seeks the alliance of currant jelly, the shoulder civilly declineth it; why a loin of veal (a pretty problem), being itself unctuous, seeketh the adventitious lubricity of melted butter; and why the same part in pork, not more oleaginous, abhorreth it; why the French bean sympathizes with the flesh of deer; why salt fish points to parsnip, ...
— Charles Lamb • Walter Jerrold

... que plus tard, sous les armes Plusieurs donons, designes par le sort, Loin des parents; versant d'ameres larmes, Allaient trouver ou la gloire ou la mort. Ces jours de deuil par milliers dans l'histoire Ne viendront plus, sur nous s'appesantir Amis, volons an temple de ...
— Olla Podrida • Frederick Marryat (AKA Captain Marryat)

... garments of fibre, the man wearing only a loin cloth, and in case of cold weather a piece of the same material covered the shoulders and back. The woman had a short skirt folded together at the back, and both sexes used rattan caps. Besides sago their main subsistence was, and still is, all kinds of animals, including ...
— Through Central Borneo: - An Account of Two Years' Travel in the Land of Head-Hunters - Between the Years 1913 and 1917 • Carl Lumholtz

... binding portion of the betrothal ceremony. The date of marriage is fixed by a Brahman, this being the only purpose for which he is employed, and a bride-price varying from six to twelve rupees is paid. On this occasion the women draw caricatures with turmeric or charcoal on the loin-cloth of the boy's father, which they manage to purloin. The marriage ceremony follows generally the Hindu form. The bridegroom puts on women's ornaments and carries with him an iron nut-cracker or dagger to keep off evil spirits. After the ...
— The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India - Volume II • R. V. Russell

... answered the editor, "seldom over four feet ten inches for the man and the woman two or three inches shorter; they use their toes like fingers, they wear only a loin-cloth, their hair is fuzzy like a black bush, and they seldom use ...
— The Boy With the U.S. Census • Francis Rolt-Wheeler

... lovers staked was lost As surely as if it were lawful coin: And the sin I impute to each frustrate ghost Was, the unlit lamp and the ungirt loin, Though the end in sight was ...
— English Literature: Modern - Home University Library Of Modern Knowledge • G. H. Mair

... the substantials! The state of a fat Turkey now, The decorum, the grandeur he marches in with. Then his sauce, with oranges and onions, O, I declare, I do much honour a chine of beef! O lord! I do reverence a loin of veal! ...
— The Mirror of Taste, and Dramatic Censor, Vol. I, No. 4, April 1810 • Various

... so do the warnings of this last sympathetic adviser change and flicker. Sweet things are always sweet, and bitter things always bitter; vinegar is always sour, and ginger always hot in the mouth, too, whatever our state of health or feeling. But our taste for roast loin of mutton, high game, salmon cutlets, and Gorgonzola cheese varies immensely from time to time, with the passing condition of our health and digestion. In illness, and especially in sea-sickness, one gets ...
— Falling in Love - With Other Essays on More Exact Branches of Science • Grant Allen

... body. The men grow long beards. Men and women generally go about naked, but some of the Indians near the river have adopted long shawls in which they wrap themselves. After marriage the women wear a loin-cloth, but nothing at all before marriage. The girls when young are attractive, with luminous, expressive, dark brown eyes. These Cashibos are supposed to be the "white race" of the Amazon. They are nevertheless not white at all, but belong to a yellow race, although they are, ...
— Across Unknown South America • Arnold Henry Savage Landor

... towels from an office on the stairs, but the great majority simply rubbed themselves with their hands and then dried in the sun. All washed their faces in the dirty water and rinsed their mouths with it. The men took off their loin clothes and washed these out, then wrapped them about their bodies and came out dripping water. The lone woman was very fat. She waded into the water and when she came out her thin robe clung to her massive form revealing ...
— The Critic in the Orient • George Hamlin Fitch

... tres jeune encore quand il est entre au saint ministere et qu'il fut nomme pasteur a Hambach, village de la Lorraine. L'endroit etait assez grand, mais de peu de ressources, et il etait heureux de trouver quelqu'un qui, dans son inexperience et loin de sa famille, fut capable de lui aider a fonder sa maison, selon les usages et les traditions ...
— Welsh Fairy-Tales And Other Stories • Edited by P. H. Emerson

... scolds and jeers For ungirt loin and lamp unlit; In front the unmanageable years, The ...
— The Song of the Sword - and Other Verses • W. E. Henley

... to me, my friend, that a Samana from the forest came to me and wanted to learn from me! Never before this has happened to me, that a Samana came to me with long hair and an old, torn loin-cloth! Many young men come to me, and there are also sons of Brahmans among them, but they come in beautiful clothes, they come in fine shoes, they have perfume in their hair and money in their pouches. This is, oh Samana, how the young men are like who ...
— Siddhartha • Herman Hesse

... breathed his last, I believe, from sunstroke. It was a royal present for "the chief of the great powers." I should say the gifts were, on the proper signal, dragged out of the field of food by a troop of young men, all with their lava-lavas kilted almost into a loin-cloth. The art is to swoop on the food-field, pick up with unerring swiftness the right things and quantities, swoop forth again on the open, and separate, leaving the gifts in a new pile: so you may see a covey of birds in a corn-field. This reminds me of a ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 25 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... du Langage, and in his Hist. des Langues Semitiques. I quote from the latter, p. 445: Sans doute les langues, comme tout ce qui est organise, sont sujettes a la loi du developpement graduel. En soutenant que le langage primitif possedait les elements necessaires a son integrite, nous sommes loin de dire que les mecanismes d'un age plus avance y fussent arrives a leur pleine existence. Tout y etait, mais confusement et sans distinction. Le temps seul et les progres de l'esprit humain pouvaient operer un discernement dans cette obscure synthese, et ...
— On the Study of Words • Richard C Trench

... garment around their loins, and to it was attached a piece of stuff in front, which was thrown over the shoulders and hung loose at the back. The women were dressed the same as the men, except that their loin vestment reached to their knees. The King's ...
— The Philippine Islands • John Foreman

... a good many of their farces in private life; most of them found it easier, as well as pleasanter, to do so. "The cold beef," Mrs. Polkington said, mentally reviewing her larder, "can be hashed; that and a small boned loin of mutton will do, he would naturally expect to be treated as one of the family; fortunately the apple tart has not ...
— The Good Comrade • Una L. Silberrad

... curse of this beautiful region. Here for a loin-cloth or two a mother offers eagerly to sell one of her offspring and deliver it into perpetual bondage to his Belooch soldiers. Whole villages are destroyed, in the most remorseless manner, by the slave-hunters to obtain their victims. The chiefs of the interior are as fond ...
— Great African Travellers - From Mungo Park to Livingstone and Stanley • W.H.G. Kingston

... literature, or science, or theology, even, it declines in vitality—it torpifies. However great a conquest the combatant may achieve in any of these arenas, "striding away from the huge gratitude, his club shouldered, lion-fleece round loin and flank", he must be "bound on the next new labour, height o'er height ever ...
— Introduction to Robert Browning • Hiram Corson

... by separating the shoulder from the ribs, and then dividing the ribs. To carve a loin of veal, begin at the smaller end and separate the ribs. Help each one to a piece of the kidney and its fat. Carve pork and mutton in the ...
— A Treatise on Domestic Economy - For the Use of Young Ladies at Home and at School • Catherine Esther Beecher

... little muscular strain. Under the backbone in the hind quarter is the place from which the tenderest meat comes. This is usually called the tenderloin. Sometimes in beef and also in pork it is taken out whole and sometimes it is left to be cut up with the rest of the loin. In old animals, and in those parts of the body where there has been much muscular action, the neck and the legs for example, the muscle fibers are tough and hard. But there is another point which is of even greater importance than this. The ...
— Practical Suggestions for Mother and Housewife • Marion Mills Miller

... fat forms about a third of the weight, the largest part being in the loin. In mutton, one-half is fat; in pork, three-quarters; while poultry and ...
— The Easiest Way in Housekeeping and Cooking - Adapted to Domestic Use or Study in Classes • Helen Campbell

... I had warned my boys that we would start on our return at ten o'clock. The hour was nearly at hand, and in reply to my inquiry if our portion of the beef had been secured, Jack Splann said that he had cut off half a loin, a side of ribs, and enough steak for breakfast. Splann and I tied the beef to our cantle-strings, and when we returned to the group, Sponsilier was telling of the stampede of his herd in the Panhandle about a month before. "But that run wasn't a circumstance ...
— The Outlet • Andy Adams

... to the Commissioners of Customs, to let his goods pass free. Home from my office to my Lord's lodgings where my wife had got ready a very fine dinner— viz. a dish of marrow bones; a leg of mutton; a loin of veal; a dish of fowl, three pullets, and a dozen of larks all in a dish; a great tart, a neat's tongue, a dish of anchovies; a dish of prawns and cheese. My company was my father, my uncle Fenner, his two sons, Mr. Pierce, and all ...
— The Diary of Samuel Pepys • Samuel Pepys

... the gardens there was a tinkle of bells made by the wind blowing them, and a gong kept muttering somewhere. Kiyi rolled over on the edge of Sadler's yellow robe, curled up, and shut his eyes, and went to sleep. He had no clothes but a green loin cloth. His hair was done up in a topknot. Then I looked at Sadler, and then at Kiyi, and then I thought he was the littlest ...
— The Belted Seas • Arthur Colton

... Stripped to loin-cloth in the sun, Search me well and watch me close! Tell me how my tricks are done— Tell me how the mango grows? Give a man who is not made To his trade Swords to fling and catch again, Coins to ring and snatch again, Men to harm and cure again. Snakes to charm and lure again— He'll be hurt by ...
— Songs from Books • Rudyard Kipling

... le chagrin me devore, Vite a table je me mets, Loin des objets que j'abhorre, Avec joie j'y trouve la paix. Peu d'amis, restes d'un naufrage Je rassemble autour de moi, Et je me ris de l'etalage Qu'a chez lui toujours ...
— Letters of Horace Walpole - Volume I • Horace Walpole

... will never be embarrassed by having too much cold meat on hand, because she will be able by her skill so to vary the dishes that the appetites of those for whom she caters will never tire of it. Even a small piece of the loin of mutton may be served in half-a-dozen different ways, and be relished by those who are tired of the mutton-chop or ...
— Nelson's Home Comforts - Thirteenth Edition • Mary Hooper

... revolving days had nearly made up the full year. He bothered himself but little with the family-arrangements, but dined in his own room, often turning night into day. His repast always consisted of coffee, boiled rice and milk, and mutton from the loin. Every day be sent for the cook, and solemnly gave her his instructions. The poor creature was utterly overwhelmed by his grave courtesy and his "awfu' sicht of words." Well she might be, for he addressed her in such terms as these:—"Owing to dyspepsia affecting my system, ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 11, No. 65, March, 1863 • Various

... Rouletabille stopped short before this prehistoric invasion. He would never have imagined that a few miles from the Newsky Prospect he could have found himself in the midst of such a spectacle. These savages had not even a loin-cloth. Where did they come from with their herd? From what remote place in the world or in old and gone history had they emerged? What was this new invasion? What prodigious slaughter-house awaited these unruly herds? They made a noise like thunder ...
— The Secret of the Night • Gaston Leroux

... six-foot-four in his loin-cloth, as black and glistening as a polished ebony statue. The enormous hands at the end of great, over-long arms almost touched his knees; the chest and shoulders and abdomen were hard as iron, rippling with ...
— The Hawk of Egypt • Joan Conquest



Words linked to "Loin" :   pork loin, beef loin, lumbus, loin of lamb, body part, quadruped, human being, homo, cut of meat, cut, human, man



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