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Rue   Listen
verb
Rue  v. t.  (past & past part. rued; pres. part. ruing)  
1.
To lament; to regret extremely; to grieve for or over. "I wept to see, and rued it from my heart." "Thy will Chose freely what it now so justly rues."
2.
To cause to grieve; to afflict. (Obs.) "God wot, it rueth me."
3.
To repent of, and withdraw from, as a bargain; to get released from. (Prov. Eng.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Rue" Quotes from Famous Books



... everything possible was done for her; but she sank gradually, and died from exhaustion. The second of these tragical incidents plunged a Paris family in deep sorrow. The parents, who lived in a beautiful detached house in the Rue de la Bienfaisance, had arranged that their children and some youthful cousins were to play before a party of friends on New Year's Night on the stage of a little theatre which had just been added to their house. The play was to represent ...
— Christmas: Its Origin and Associations - Together with Its Historical Events and Festive Celebrations During Nineteen Centuries • William Francis Dawson

... tower stands by itself in the Rue Carreterie; it is machicolated and has a delicate little spire. It is all that remains of the church of the Augustinians. Nearly opposite is a ...
— In Troubadour-Land - A Ramble in Provence and Languedoc • S. Baring-Gould

... to remain in the room and see them play at cards. At length, however, there came three gentle taps at the outer door. "Ora a tempo perche vene andata," exclaimed Her Highness at the sound, having ordered a person to call with this signal to see me out of the palace to the Rue Nicaise, where my carriage was in waiting ...
— Marguerite de Navarre - Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois Queen of Navarre • Marguerite de Navarre

... the door of the little Hotel de Turenne, in the Rue Vivienne. The occupant, who had just alighted, was about to enter the hotel, when the hunt, who was standing before the door, with his hands plunged to the very bottom of his breeches pockets, stopped the way, and, not very ...
— Joseph II. and His Court • L. Muhlbach

... than a quarter of an hour ago upon the threshold of our attic in the hideous guise of that abominable Laporte. He had spent two days in collecting old clothes that resembled those of that infamous wretch, and in taking possession of one of the derelict rooms in the house in the Rue des Pipots. Then while we were expecting every moment that Laporte would order our arrest, milor assumed the personality of the monster, hoodwinked the sergeant on the dark staircase, and by that wonderfully audacious coup ...
— The League of the Scarlet Pimpernel • Baroness Orczy

... night, That restless mariner speeded. Who knows—who knows what seas He is now careering o'er? Behind, the eternal breeze, And that mocking bark, before! For, oh, till sky And earth shall die, And their death leave none to rue it, That boat must flee O'er the boundless sea, And that ship ...
— The Complete Poems of Sir Thomas Moore • Thomas Moore et al

... approaching. 'My father!' cries Michiella, distractedly; 'the hour is near: it will be death to your daughter! Imprison Camillo: I can bring twenty witnesses to prove that he has sworn you are illegally the lord of this country. You will rue the marriage. Do as you once did. Be bold in time. The arrow-head is on ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... coloured like wooden balls. My aunts never came there. My mother used to send money, bon-bons, and toys. The foster-father died, and my nurse married a concierge, who used to pull open the door at 65 Rue de Provence. ...
— My Double Life - The Memoirs of Sarah Bernhardt • Sarah Bernhardt

... sang her charms in varied strains, Her praise to every minstrel told: The bards of distant Keri know That she is spotless as the snow. These proofs of love I hoped might bind My Morfydd to be ever true: Alas! to deep despair consign'd, My bosom's blighted hopes I rue, And the base craft that gave her charms, Oh, anguish! ...
— The Poetry of Wales • John Jenkins

... Louis," I answered, "that my mission in Paris is of the nature of a search. For ten days I have haunted all the places where one goes,—the Race Course, the Bois, the Armenonville and Pre Catelan, the Rue de la Paix, the theatres. I have seen them nearly every day. To-night they were at ...
— The Lost Ambassador - The Search For The Missing Delora • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... placed at my command the large steamship 'Himalaya' to carry about 60 astronomers, British and Foreign. Some were landed at Santander: I with many at Bilbao. The Eclipse was fairly well observed: I personally did not do my part well. The most important were Mr De La Rue's photographic operations. At Greenwich I had arranged a very careful series of observations with the Great Equatoreal, ...
— Autobiography of Sir George Biddell Airy • George Biddell Airy

... old friend used to laugh, and that made me think her callous and foolish. One day our bonne—like all servants, a lover of gossip—came to us delighted with a story which proved to me how just had been my estimate of the male animal. The grocer at the corner of our rue, married only four years to a charming and devoted little wife, had run ...
— Tea-table Talk • Jerome K. Jerome

... of capital geared up to industry are a specialty entirely our own. We are much mistaken. Little Belgium has in the Societe an agency for development unique among financial institutions. Its imposing marble palace on the Rue Royale is the nerve center of a corporate life that has no geographical lines. With a capital of 62,000,000 francs it has piled up reserves of more than 400,000,000 francs. In addition to branches called "filial ...
— An African Adventure • Isaac F. Marcosson

... tears and rue, Stand by his grave this sad November day, Sadder that he untimely goes away, Who sang and wrought so well for that high dream We call America—the world made new, New with clean hope and faith and ...
— The Lonely Dancer and Other Poems • Richard Le Gallienne

... she let down fall, And some dropt Laura too,— But "'Tis my country!" yet she cried, "My country may not rue." ...
— Laura Secord, the heroine of 1812. - A Drama. And Other Poems. • Sarah Anne Curzon

... more serious," said one of them, "is that there is something very bad behind all this. During the night the doors of more than fifteen mansions were marked with a cross, among the marked houses being those of the Princess de Lieven, in the Rue Saint Florentin, and of Mme. ...
— The Memoirs of Victor Hugo • Victor Hugo

... but guessed, this might be A poem for you made by me, Whose billowy lines just now fly Up where you stand graceful and high! But look you, this knowledge, to no purpose grew it, I farther will go, Heaven guard, lest we rue it,— If only ...
— Poems and Songs • Bjornstjerne Bjornson

... rushed to listen to the Baron's impassioned eloquence was Helene Cecille Stille, now the proprietress of the handsomest hotel on the Rue Mont-martre. It need scarcely be premised that the wandering and appreciative eyes of the lecturer had rested on the beautiful American, as she sat before him in an attitude expressive of dormant passion, tinged with an imperious coquetry which was one ...
— Danger! A True History of a Great City's Wiles and Temptations • William Howe

... Your bitterness You presently shall rue. Had I known you outlawed, shelterless, Hunted the country through— Trust me, the day that brought you here Would have seemed the fairest of many a year; And a feast I had counted it indeed When you turned to Solhoug for refuge ...
— The Feast at Solhoug • Henrik Ibsen

... Soissons would, unless won over by the archbishop, have ever consented to such a plan, for both are honourable gentlemen, and Soissons at least is a Frenchman, which can hardly be said of Bouillon, whose ancestors have been independent princes here for centuries. However, I fear that he will rue the day he championed the cause of Soissons. It was no affair of his, and it is carrying hospitality too far to endanger life and kingdom rather than tell two guests that they must seek a refuge elsewhere. All Europe was open to them. As a Guise the archbishop ...
— Won by the Sword - A Story of the Thirty Years' War • G.A. Henty

... victory thou hast gained, More pleasing to the women of Creeve Rue, He to have died and thou to have remained, To them the brave who ...
— Poems • Denis Florence MacCarthy

... you, dear Gawaine. For bitterly shall Mark rue his unknightly act. Shall I even wait for my event with Sir Tristram ...
— In the Court of King Arthur • Samuel Lowe

... frayle bodyes wandreth in care and payne And lyke to botes troubled with tempest sore From rocke to rocke cast in this se mundayne, Before our iyen beholde we ever more The deth of them that passed are before. Alas mysfortune us causeth oft to rue Whan to vayne thoughtis our ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol. 5 • Various

... writ in tears, And merry stanzas steeped in rue! When all the world in drab appears The fool must still in motley woo. Tho' bitter be the cud he chew, Still must he grind his foolish grist; Still must he ply, the long day through, The ...
— A line-o'-verse or two • Bert Leston Taylor

... Rue it not, dear, that so swiftly thy tenderness yielded thee to me— Dream not again that I think lightly or lowly of thee. Divers the arrows of Love: from some that but graze on the surface, Softly the poison is shed, slowly to sicken the heart; Others, triumphantly ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 363, January, 1846 • Various

... say I did; but part of it was bad, and as the good wouldn't stay without the bad, out they both had to go, and bitterly they'll rue the day they ...
— Sarah's School Friend • May Baldwin

... rue, wormwood, sage, mint, and lavender flowers, each, 1/2 oz. Bruised nutmeg, cloves, angelica root, and camphor, each, 1/4 oz. Alcohol (rectified), 4 oz. Concentrated ...
— The Art of Perfumery - And Methods of Obtaining the Odors of Plants • G. W. Septimus Piesse

... precincts of that resort for foreigners and provincials in Paris, the Palais Royal, is situate the Rue du 24 Fevrier. This revolutionary name, given after the last outbreak, is still pronounced with difficulty by those who, of old, were wont to call it the Rue de Valois. People are becoming accustomed to ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Volume 1, No. 2, July, 1850. • Various

... was, and why she is so passionately attached to Tunis, nobody in Russia seems to know, not even her doting husband, who bows to all her caprices. But two persons could explain the matter—a Tunisian guide named Abdul, and a rather mysterious individual who follows a humble calling in the Rue Ben-Ziad, close to the Tunis bazaars. This latter is the Princess's personal attendant during her yearly visit to Tunis. He accompanies her everywhere, may be seen in the hall of her hotel when she is at home, ...
— The Princess And The Jewel Doctor - 1905 • Robert Hichens

... gentleman, lodging at the Hotel de Mayence, Rue Saint-Honore, near the Place Vendome, one morning received a visit from a confidential agent of the Ministry, who was an expert in "winding up" business. This elegant personage, who stepped out of an elegant cab, and was dressed in the most elegant style, was requested ...
— The Muse of the Department • Honore de Balzac

... representation of Britannicus? Some admirers of Racine had praised the piece so much to me, that not being able to get a box, I sent my valet at ten o'clock to keep a place for me. I thought that I should never reach the Hotel de Bourgogne, although I left my carriage at the corner of the Rue Mauconseil: without Chapelle and Mauvillain, who know all the actors in Paris, I should never have succeeded in getting a place. Do not mistake this eagerness of the public; there was much more malevolence than curiosity ...
— The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, April 1844 - Volume 23, Number 4 • Various

... over Belgium. As for the cities, we are doing the best we can to encourage business. Of course, with things the way they are now, it is difficult. I can only ask you to go down one of the principal business streets here, the Rue de la Neuf, for instance, and price the articles that you find in the shops and compare them with the Berlin prices. The merchants of Brussels are not having to sacrifice their stock by cutting prices, and, equally important, there are people buying. I can ...
— New York Times Current History; The European War, Vol 2, No. 2, May, 1915 - April-September, 1915 • Various

... presently, Good-Humour spread her mantle over us anew, and quip and jest and laughter decked our speech, until the noise of our merry-making drifting out through the open windows must have been borne upon the breeze of that August night down the rue Saint-Dominique, across the rue de l'Enfer, to the very ears perhaps of those within the Luxembourg, telling them that Bardelys and his friends kept another of those revels which were become a byword in Paris, and had contributed not a little to the sobriquet of "Magnificent" ...
— Bardelys the Magnificent • Rafael Sabatini

... They have been living in la Rue des Venaigrurs, but last night they announced that they were ...
— The Son of Monte Cristo • Jules Lermina

... answered her guide, with a peculiar look, 'and yet I know not whether his descendants have not cause to rue ...
— Henrietta Temple - A Love Story • Benjamin Disraeli

... is little pleasure, if any, In waking the past anew; My days and nights have been many; Lost chances many I rue— My days and nights have been many; Now I pray that they be few, When I think on the hill-side, Annie, Where I dreamt ...
— Poems • Adam Lindsay Gordon

... more tangible than that which the poet gathers, but the farmer as little suspects its existence as he does that of the poet. I can use what he would gladly reject. His daisies, his buttercups, his orange hawkweed, his yarrow, his meadow-rue, serve my purpose better than they do his. They look better on the printed page than they do in the haymow. Yes, and his timothy and clover have their literary uses, and his new-mown hay may perfume a line in poetry. When one of our poets writes, "wild carrot blooms ...
— Under the Maples • John Burroughs

... be trifled with in any such way," he passionately exclaimed. "You shall rue your ...
— Katherine's Sheaves • Mrs. Georgie Sheldon

... conceded. "But it's quite a cheery district, really. You won't have to doss down in the cemetery itself, you know. These two streets here—" he flicked a pencil—"will hold practically all your battalion, at its present strength. There's a capital house in the Rue Jean Jacques Rousseau which will do for Battalion Headquarters. The corporal over there will give you your billets ...
— All In It K(1) Carries On - A Continuation of the First Hundred Thousand • John Hay Beith (AKA: Ian Hay)

... him, Jimmie was taken prisoner, and before sunrise was shot as a spy. He was seldom shot. Or else why on his sleeve was the badge for "stalking"? But always to have to make believe became monotonous. Even "dry shopping" along the Rue de la Paix, when you pretend you can have anything you see in any window, leaves one just as rich, but unsatisfied. So the advice of the war correspondent to seek out German spies came to Jimmie like a day ...
— The Boy Scout and Other Stories for Boys • Richard Harding Davis

... have nourished such a viper in his own personal bosom. "I have shaken the reptile from me, however," said Costigan; "and as for his uncle, I'll have such a revenge on that old man, as shall make 'um rue the day ...
— The History of Pendennis • William Makepeace Thackeray

... heard. I was in the library alcove one day in the Christmas vacation, reading the 'Murders in the Rue Morgue,' when Jelly and Mr. Gilroy walked in. They didn't see me, and I didn't pay any attention to them at first—I'd just got to the place where the detective says, 'Is that the mark of a human hand?'—but pretty soon they got to scrapping ...
— Just Patty • Jean Webster

... rue it, Edward Benden, you take my word for it! You savage barbarian, to deal thus with a decent woman that never shamed you nor gave you an ill word! Lack-a-day, but I thank all the saints on my bended knees I'm not your ...
— All's Well - Alice's Victory • Emily Sarah Holt

... glass, giving me ample time to admire one of the most perfect figures I ever beheld. She was most becomingly dressed, and betrayed a foot and ancle which for symmetry and "chaussure," might have challenged the Rue Rivoli itself to ...
— The Confessions of Harry Lorrequer, Vol. 2 • Charles James Lever

... his wife passed away the reward of devotion might be reaped; but she never forgave him, expressed the conviction that she would outlive him by many years, and exhausted her ingenuity to make the old man rue his bargain. Only one experience, and that repeated as surely as Mr. Blee met Mr. Lezzard, was more trying to the latter than all the accumulated misfortune of his sorry state—Gaffer's own miseries appeared absolutely trivial by comparison with Mr. Blee's comments ...
— Children of the Mist • Eden Phillpotts

... of the finest houses of the rue Neuve-des-Mathurins, at half-past eleven at night, two young women were sitting before the fireplace of a boudoir hung with blue velvet of that tender shade, with shimmering reflections, which French industry ...
— A Daughter of Eve • Honore de Balzac

... of rue And trefoil too, In marrow of bear And blood of trold, Be cool’d the spear, Three times cool’d, When hot from fire Of ...
— Marsk Stig's Daughters - and other Songs and Ballads - - - Translator: George Borrow • Thomas J. Wise

... new dress, and 'ain't had one to my back for two years, and them Carroll women in a different one every time they appear out, and the girl having enough clothes for a Vanderbilt. I guess Stella Griggs will rue the day. She's a fool, and always was. If you can afford to give that man money you can afford to get me a new dress. I'd go to the weddin'—it's free, in the church—if I had ...
— The Debtor - A Novel • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... when the brass of the woodman Sever'd the bark and the sap: but the chiefs that administer judgment, Guarding the law of the Gods, as a sign to the sons of Achaia Bear it in hand:—upon this do I swear, and severe is the sanction! Rue for Achilles hereafter shall rise in the Danaeid leaguer:— Bitter the yearning shall be—nor in thee, howsoever afflicted, Succour be found at their need—but remorse shall be raging within thee, Tearing ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 367, May 1846 • Various

... sentence fondly whispered when he bent over me at the table, 'Maurice, my king.' As I bade adieu to my guardian, and paused before the princely figure whom the world called my husband, our eyes met, and he flushed, and muttered, 'You will rue your rashness.' Silently I looked on the handsome features that had so suddenly grown loathsome to me, and he snatched my wedding ring from the table and held it appealingly towards me, saying remorsefully, ...
— Vashti - or, Until Death Us Do Part • Augusta J. Evans Wilson

... sausage of to-day is the Lucanica unchanged; the same tough, greasy, odoriferous compound, in fact, that Cicero describes as "an intestine, stuffed with minced pork, mixed with ground pepper, cummin, savory, rue, rock-parsley, berries of laurel, and suet." And we have only to add that mingling with the above-mentioned condiments there was an all-pervading flavour of wood-smoke, due to the sausage's place ...
— The Naples Riviera • Herbert M. Vaughan

... own 'twas not so neatly done As you know how to do it, And that the fright out-did the fun, But still I do not rue it. I can afford the extra beat My heart took at your "Oh!" Which plainly said that kiss was sweet— When ...
— The New Penelope and Other Stories and Poems • Frances Fuller Victor

... sigh of relief sometimes at the thought that I, at any rate, found a husband before the present man-famine began. Don't refuse him this time, there's a dear, or, mark my words, you'll have cause to rue it—unless you have beforehand got engaged to somebody better than he. You will not if you have not already, for the exposure is sure ...
— The Hand of Ethelberta • Thomas Hardy

... added, "touch not the stopple; if you do, you shall rue it. That bell is my life, I have put all I have learned in life into it. If any man were to touch that stopple, I would ...
— ZigZag Journeys in Northern Lands; - The Rhine to the Arctic • Hezekiah Butterworth

... him ony war for that, an' tha sees it'll save her a bit o' trouble, for shoo'll nobbut have one booit to black. But shoo's a trimmer, an' if he doesn't live to rue his bargain, awst be chaited. Shoo play'd him one o'th' nicest tricks, th' day after they gate wed 'at awve heeard tell on for ...
— Yorksher Puddin' - A Collection of the Most Popular Dialect Stories from the - Pen of John Hartley • John Hartley

... Susy Lansing at one of the Rue de la Paix openings, where rows of ladies wan with heat and emotion sat for hours in rapt attention while spectral apparitions in incredible raiment tottered endlessly past ...
— The Glimpses of the Moon • Edith Wharton

... Grand' Rue at Montricheux, flickering against the panes of the shop-windows and calling forth a hundred provocative points of light from the silver and jewels, the shining silks and embroidery, with which the shrewd Swiss shopkeeper seeks to open the purse of the foreigner. It seemed to chase ...
— The Vision of Desire • Margaret Pedler

... the Trocadero, fairly takes on to me now the tender grace of a day that is dead. Re-reading the last chapters of The Tragic Muse I catch again the very odour of Paris, which comes up in the rich rumble of the Rue de la Paix—with which my room itself, for that matter, seems impregnated—and which hangs for reminiscence about the embarrassed effort to "finish," not ignobly, within my already exceeded limits; an effort prolonged each ...
— The Tragic Muse • Henry James

... fountain is formed of two basins, which are surmounted by a dome of exquisite openwork, elevated on six columns. It was there that I knew a learned Frenchman, Monsieur l'Abbe du Cros, who belonged to the Jacobin monastery in the Rue Saint Jacques. Half the library of Erpenius is at Marmaduke Lodge, the other half being at the theological gallery at Cambridge. I used to read the books, seated under the ornamented portal. These things are only shown to a select number of curious travellers. Do you know, you ridiculous ...
— The Man Who Laughs • Victor Hugo

... the interests of the Society, and to perplex the minds of the people of the west of Spain respecting its views. But I confess I am chiefly apprehensive of the reacting at Seville of the Valencian drama, which I have such unfortunate cause to rue, as I am the victim on whom an aggravated party have wreaked their vengeance, and for the very cogent reason that I was within their reach. I think, my dearest sir, you know sufficient of my disposition to be aware that I am one of the last people disposed ...
— Letters of George Borrow - to the British and Foreign Bible Society • George Borrow

... the Freethinker contained an account of the first part of "La Bible Amusante," issued by the Anti-Clerical publishing house in the Rue des Ecoles. That notice was from my own pen, and I venture to reprint ...
— Prisoner for Blasphemy • G. W. [George William] Foote

... Three Pebbles—la rue des Trois Cailloux—which goes up from the station through the heart of Amiens, was the crowded highway. Here were the best shops—the hairdresser, at the left-hand side, where all day long officers down from the line came in to have elaborate luxury in the way of close crops with ...
— Now It Can Be Told • Philip Gibbs

... your chaffing, young fellow," said the tall girl, "or I will give you what shall make you wipe your face; be civil, or you will rue it." ...
— Lavengro - The Scholar, The Gypsy, The Priest • George Borrow

... fields dotted with farmhouses and cottages. How he loved the fertile valley, with its little river winding in and out between green banks! It was all so beautiful, but it was time to descend. He must not give his pet too much liberty, or he might rue his indiscretion. He headed his machine for the open space back of the Omnibus House, and began the descent. Then, something snapped, and he fell. He remembered as he fell the look of horror on the up-raised faces of his friends, and then ...
— Grace Harlowe's Sophomore Year at High School • Jessie Graham Flower

... this phenomenon was as follows: Lousteau lived in the Rue des Martyrs in pretty ground-floor rooms with a garden, and splendidly furnished. When he settled there in 1833 he had come to an agreement with an upholsterer that kept his pocket money low for a long time. These rooms were let for twelve hundred francs. The months of January, April, July, ...
— Parisians in the Country - The Illustrious Gaudissart, and The Muse of the Department • Honore de Balzac

... by the main street, the Rue de la Republique, which the Germans deliberately and ruthlessly burnt on September 2nd and 3rd, 1914. We moved slowly along it through the blackened ruins of houses large and small, systematically fired by the German petroleurs, in revenge for a supposed attack by civilians ...
— Towards The Goal • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... there's rue for you." Strange and involuntary is the law of association! I can never see the garnishing and seasoning herbs of the garden without thinking of the mad words of distraught Ophelia. I fancy, however, that we are all practical enough ...
— The Home Acre • E. P. Roe

... Base Veal that Deuceace took his lodgian, at the Hotel de Bang, in a very crooked street called the Rue del Ascew; and if he'd been the Archbishop of Devonshire, or the Duke of Canterbury, he could not have given himself greater hairs, I can tell you. Nothink was too fine for us now; we had a sweet of rooms on the first floor, which belonged to the prime minister of France (at least ...
— Memoirs of Mr. Charles J. Yellowplush - The Yellowplush Papers • William Makepeace Thackeray

... was able, however, to the last, to enjoy the summer at his country-house, at Champrosay, and even to travel in an invalid's chair; in 1896 he visited for the first time London and Oxford, and saw Mr. George Meredith. In Paris he had long occupied rooms in the Rue de Bellechasse, where Madame Alphonse Daudet was accustomed to entertain a brilliant company. But in 1897 it became impossible for him to mount five flights of stairs any longer, and he moved to the first floor of No. 41 Rue de l'Universite. Here on the 16th of December, ...
— The Nabob • Alphonse Daudet

... upon her career, Ninon converted her property into prudent and safe securities, and purchased a city house in the Rue des Tournelles au Marais, a locality at that time the center of fashionable society, and another for a summer residence at Picpusse, in the environs of Paris. A select society of wits and gallant chevaliers soon gathered around her, and it required influence ...
— Life, Letters, and Epicurean Philosophy of Ninon de L'Enclos, - the Celebrated Beauty of the Seventeenth Century • Robinson [and] Overton, ed. and translation.

... from 1610 to 1617 in the Rue St. Thomas-du-Louvre. Polite society began to gather there soon after its completion, and began to desert it only thirty years later. The heroic romances of the period were among the chief topics of conversation; and this is easily understood: they were meant as copies of this same ...
— The English Novel in the Time of Shakespeare • J. J. Jusserand

... with hound and horn Earl Percy took the way; The child may rue that is unborn The hunting of ...
— Legends That Every Child Should Know • Hamilton Wright Mabie

... kind of brain-power I happen to possess, which is the point. The processes by which a Birmingham jeweller makes the wonderful things which we attribute to 'French taste' when we see them in the shops of the Rue de la Paix are, of course, mere imbecility—compared to my performances in Responsions. Lucky for me, at any rate, that the world has decided it so. I get a good time of it—and the Birmingham jeweller ...
— Marcella • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... all night. On Thursday, not long before noon, we are at the bridge of Neuilly; here is Paris with her thousand black domes, the goal and purpose of thy journey! Arrived at the Inn de la Providence in the Rue des Vieux Augustins, Charlotte demands a room; hastens to bed; sleeps all afternoon and night, till ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Vol. V (of X) - Great Britain and Ireland III • Various

... free, I'll kill you!" he muttered, between his teeth, to Julius. "You'll rue this ...
— Slow and Sure - The Story of Paul Hoffman the Young Street-Merchant • Horatio Alger

... opportunity of making a scandal. Sixte meant that Mme. de Bargeton should compromise herself with Lucien in such a way that she should be "lost," as the saying goes; so he posed as Mme. de Bargeton's humble confidant, admired Lucien in the Rue du Minage, and pulled him to pieces everywhere else. Nais had gradually given him les petites entrees, in the language of the court, for the lady no longer mistrusted her elderly admirer; but Chatelet had taken too much for granted—love was still in the Platonic stage, ...
— Two Poets - Lost Illusions Part I • Honore de Balzac

... returned from Brittany, he had engaged one small, plain apartment in the Rue Bonaparte, the Latin quarter of the city,—a favorite locality of students. Here he again took up his abode, or, rather, here he passed his nights; he could scarcely be said to have a dwelling-place by day. From dawn until late in the evening he wandered through the ...
— Fairy Fingers - A Novel • Anna Cora Mowatt Ritchie

... care to study in one of the earliest attempts of his joyous youth the man whose ripened genius was to place him at the very head of all the biographers of whom the world can boast. My hopes were increased by the elegance and the accuracy of the typography with which my publishers, Messrs. De La Rue & Co., adorned this reprint. I was disappointed in my expectations. These curious Letters met with a neglect which they did not deserve. Twice, moreover, I was drawn away from the task that I had set before me by other works. ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 1 • Boswell, Edited by Birkbeck Hill

... courtyards, at cross-roads, in the fields, and sometimes on the threshing-floors. Plants which in burning give out a thick smoke and an aromatic smell are much sought after for fuel on these occasions; among the plants used for the purpose are giant-fennel, thyme, rue, chervil-seed, camomile, geranium, and penny-royal. People expose themselves, and especially their children, to the smoke, and drive it towards the orchards and the crops. Also they leap across ...
— Balder The Beautiful, Vol. I. • Sir James George Frazer

... Maaster Roger, and ef you doan't do as I tell 'ee you'll rue it to yer dyin' day. I see it comin', I see it comin'," and she lifted her skinny hand above her head. "I zee Maaster Roger beggard, I zee un starvin', I zee un mad wi' shame, I zee un ouseless, and ...
— Roger Trewinion • Joseph Hocking

... has suffered enough already from having so much concerns with the rig'lars," replied the housekeeper. "He has lost his all, and made himself a vagabond through the land; and I have reason to rue the day I ever crossed the ...
— The Spy • James Fenimore Cooper

... class, but none of their follies; and she has the reputation of being half feared, half revered. The man who dared to approach her with the coarse love-making which is the fashion among them, would rue it to the last day of his life. She seems to ...
— That Lass O' Lowrie's - 1877 • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... killing each other so near. Why, during that time, the Boche did not bomb Amiens, I cannot understand, it was thick every week-end with the British Army. One could hardly jamb oneself through the crowd in the Place Gambetta or up the Rue des Trois Cailloux. It was a struggling mass of khaki, bumping over the uneven cobblestones. What streets they were! I remember walking back from dinner one night with a Major, the agricultural expert of the Somme, and he said, "Don't ...
— An Onlooker in France 1917-1919 • William Orpen

... let us mend with speed, Or we shall suerly rue The end of everie hainous deede, In life ...
— The Works of Christopher Marlowe, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Christopher Marlowe

... but menaces and remonstrances were thrown away on the earl, who declared that he would not thank Saint Peter for admission into Paradise, if he were obliged to leave his bow and hounds at the gate. King Henry (the Second) swore by Saint Botolph to make him rue his sport, and, having caused him to be duly and formally accused, summoned him to London to answer the charge. The earl, deeming himself safer among his own vassals than among king Henry's courtiers, took no notice of the mandate. ...
— Maid Marian • Thomas Love Peacock

... one day nearly swung in a hempen collar for having looked too closely at the color of the king's crowns. This same Villon, who more than once outran the watch started in his pursuit, this noisy guest at the dens of the Rue Pierre Lescot, this spunger at the court of the Duke of Egypt, this Salvator Rosa of poesy, has strung together elegies the heartbreaking sentiment and truthful accents of which move the most pitiless and make them forget the ruffian, the vagabond and the debauchee, ...
— Bohemians of the Latin Quarter • Henry Murger

... considerable time before Paris gives in. Such is the report of a competent and impartial authority. Rumours of the most contradictory character are rife from morning till night in the open air lobby of the Assembly—the Rue des Reservoirs. Deputies who "ought to know better" circulate very absurd canards; but, as remarks a local print, "Que voulez-vous? On s'ennuie, il faut bien passer le temps!" In my last letter of Thursday night I stated that the ...
— The Insurrection in Paris • An Englishman: Davy

... will naught abate Your fierce interminable hate? Still am I doomed to rue the fate That such unfriendly neighbors made? The while ye might, in peaceful cheer, Mirror upon your waters clear, Semlin! thy Gothic steeples dear, And thy bright ...
— Poems • Victor Hugo

... dame! You've broke your promise, sly young dame, By forming this new tie, young dame, and jilting John so true, Who trudged to-night to sing to 'ee because he thought he'd bring to 'ee Good wishes as your coming spouse. May ye such trifling rue!" ...
— Time's Laughingstocks and Other Verses • Thomas Hardy

... his gifts to the city, whose general appearance, however, remained much the same. The Palais-Royal served still as a principal rendezvous. The busy streets were the Rues Saint-Denis and Saint-Honore on the right bank, the Rue Saint-Jacques on the left; and the most important shops were to be found in the Rue de la Loi, at present the Rue ...
— Balzac • Frederick Lawton

... and the word "exposition" unknown in the Academic dictionary, and the Gallic Augustus destined to rebuild the city yet an exile,—a young law-student boarded, in common with other students, in a big dreary-looking house at the corner of the Rue Grande-Mademoiselle, abutting on the Place Lauzun, and within some ten minutes walk of the Luxembourg. It was a very dingy quarter, though noble gentlemen and lovely ladies had once occupied the great ghastly ...
— Charlotte's Inheritance • M. E. Braddon

... advantage (turn them to my advantage) p. 31: cieling to ceiling (as high as the ceiling) p. 36: missing "been" added (had been in bed) p. 51: instanly to instantly (They then instantly dressed) p. 53: mercy to mercy's (for mercy's sake) p. 59: Ferronerie to Ferronnerie (Rue de la Ferronnerie) p. 64: Bartholemew to Bartholomew (Bartholomew Close) p. 68: plantive to plaintive (plaintive tone of voice) p. 69: faultering to faltering (his tongue faltering) p. 104: announed to announced (whose visit was ...
— Apparitions; or, The Mystery of Ghosts, Hobgoblins, and Haunted Houses Developed • Joseph Taylor

... immediately to talk of Mr. and Mrs. Cosway, of their goodness, their talents, their amiability; and though we spoke of nothing else, we seemed hardly to have entered into the matter, when the coachman announced the rue St. Denis, and that we were opposite Mr. Danquerville's. He insisted on descending there, and traversing a short passage to his lodgings. I was carried home. Seated by my fire-side, solitary and sad, the following dialogue took place between my ...
— Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson - Volume I • Thomas Jefferson

... see—at 102 Rue—, one of the handsomest and pleasantest streets in Paris. I remember he said he was obliged to take this appartement for three months, after which he was going to act the hermit and economise. Very unlikely that, I should think, for a man of ...
— Agatha's Husband - A Novel • Dinah Maria Craik (AKA: Dinah Maria Mulock)

... Committee, welcomed us, with lively expressions of assent from the surrounding crowd. We were invited during our stay in the city to live with our countryman, A. NOBEL, in a very comfortable villa belonging to him, Rue Malakoff, No. 53, and I cannot sufficiently commend the liberal way in which he here discharged the duties of a host and assisted us during our stay in Paris, which, though very agreeable and honouring to us, demanded an ...
— The Voyage of the Vega round Asia and Europe, Volume I and Volume II • A.E. Nordenskieold

... content with nothing less than Le Grand Colbert, rue Richelieu, No. 75, grand magasin de nouveautes tres-anciennes: ...
— Tancred - Or, The New Crusade • Benjamin Disraeli

... lookt did cry, See, see, my hart, which I did iudge to dye: Poore hart (quoth she) and then she kist his brest, VVert thou inclosd in mine, there shouldst thou rest: I causd thee die poore heart, yet rue thy dying, And saw thy death, as ...
— Seven Minor Epics of the English Renaissance (1596-1624) • Dunstan Gale

... all those who are acquainted with our plot. I kept a watch also at the Earl's door, and at length received notice that Captain Pendergrast had also visited the Earl; and only this very night I have obtained information that he and La Rue have both been at the palace. As you know, also, this morning the king gave orders that his coaches and guards should be made ready to go out hunting as usual, but suddenly, just at the moment they were to set forth, notice was sent to them that the king was unwell, and ...
— John Deane of Nottingham - Historic Adventures by Land and Sea • W.H.G. Kingston

... attempted to make a scandal of his very presence in their town. When he passed in the streets they stopped to stare at him insolently, putting up their glasses to their eyes. They followed him in his rides; they reported that he was seducing all the girls in the "Rue Basse," and, in fact, although his life was perfectly virtuous, one would have said that his presence was a contagion. Having found in a travellers' register the name of Shelley, accompanied by the qualification of "atheist!" which Byron had amiably struck out with his pen, the laureate caught at ...
— My Recollections of Lord Byron • Teresa Guiccioli

... NO- 54, Rue Basse, Passy, near Paris, April 30, 1803. How to write I know not, at a period so tremendous-nor yet how to be silent. My dearest, dearest friends ! if the war indeed prove inevitable, what a heart-breaking position is ours!-to explain it fully ...
— The Diary and Letters of Madame D'Arblay Volume 3 • Madame D'Arblay

... her soft caresses proved Too much for Meadow Rue; And next Anemone was moved; Spring Beauty whom the nymphs had loved In shady ...
— The Loom of Life • Cotton Noe

... undoubtedly the cause of casualties amongst all ranks. We left there on October 26th, and marched to Bethune, where we were again fortunate in being comfortably billeted at the Orphanage, with Officers' billets and Headquarters' Mess in the Rue de Lille. ...
— The Sherwood Foresters in the Great War 1914 - 1919 - History of the 1/8th Battalion • W.C.C. Weetman

... Creation" took place in the French capital on December 24, 1800, when Napoleon I. escaped the infernal machine in the Rue Nicaise. It was, however, in England, the home of oratorio, that the work naturally took firmest root. It was performed at the Worcester Festival of 1800, at the Hereford Festival of the following ...
— Haydn • J. Cuthbert Hadden

... father and the son did rescue her; The mother and the son shall rue the deed. So it shall be; I am resolv'd thereon. Matilda, my soul's food, those have bereft, And these of ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VIII (4th edition) • Various

... thank you," responded Strand, with an incredulous laugh, glancing alternately from Arnfinn to the knapsack, as if estimating their proportionate weight. "I am afraid you would rue your bargain if ...
— Tales From Two Hemispheres • Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen

... now? There is no reason in the world why they should not dance, if in dancing they do not shock public modesty, and offend against public decorum. In the time of Louis XIV. there were public dances at the Moulin de Javelle; in the time of Napoleon there were dances in the Rue Coquenard, and at the Porcherons, near the Rue St. Lazar. In the time of Louis XVIII. and Charles X. there were dances at the Jardin de Tivoli. But at none of these were decency outraged or morality shocked. At Tivoli, the national pastime was indulged with decency and decorum, and ...
— The International Magazine, Volume 2, No. 3, February, 1851 • Various

... at home until her return, and dashed off down the Rue St. Louis, drawing after her a hundred eyes of ...
— The Golden Dog - Le Chien d'Or • William Kirby

... that seemed a festivity at Solferino's never gave us the holiday sense Paris filled us with from the early hour in the morning when, after our little breakfast, we met downstairs in the unpretentious hotel in the Rue St. Roch where most of us stayed—if we did not stay instead at the Hotel de l'Univers et Portugal for the sake of the name. The Rue St. Roch was convenient and if we were willing to climb to the top of the narrow ...
— Nights - Rome, Venice, in the Aesthetic Eighties; London, Paris, in the Fighting Nineties • Elizabeth Robins Pennell

... action in regard to that of Paris. Those from Brittany formed an association, which soon admitted other members, and developed into the notorious Jacobin Club, so called from its meeting-place, a convent on the Rue St. Honore, once occupied by Dominican monks who had moved thither from the Rue ...
— The Life of Napoleon Bonaparte - Vol. I. (of IV.) • William Milligan Sloane

... free expressions of feeling, opinions, and even conjectures and suspicions—a weakness very unsuited to the character of a statesman, and one which Adams had during his life many times the occasion to rue. ...
— Hidden Treasures - Why Some Succeed While Others Fail • Harry A. Lewis

... twenty-three who have little money and less occupation. Bonaparte was always poorer than I. Every day we conceived some new project or other. We were on the look-out for some profitable speculation. At one time he wanted me to join him in renting several houses, then building in the Rue Montholon, to underlet them afterwards. We found the demands of the ...
— Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte, Complete • Louis Antoine Fauvelet de Bourrienne

... went out to seek the Abbe Plomb. He could not find him in his own house, nor in the cathedral; but at last, directed by the beadle, he made his way to the house at the corner of the Rue de l'Acacia, where the choir-school ...
— The Cathedral • Joris-Karl Huysmans

... Maister, and the other Mat's, Disented from the honour of their minds, And humbly praid the Knight to rue their stat's, Whom miserie to no such mischiefe binds; To him th' aleadge great reasons, and dilat's Their foes amazements, whom their valures blinds, And maks more eager t'entertaine a truce, Then they to offer words ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of The English Nation, v. 7 - England's Naval Exploits Against Spain • Richard Hakluyt

... our little meeting this morning with the few friends resident here, and some others, we went to the Protestant Chapel, in the Rue Taitbout, to hear the children examined in the Scriptures. Many of the parents were present. The class which we attended was conducted by Mademoiselle Chabot. The subject was the crucifixion of our Saviour, the 27th chapter of Matthew. The children repeated the portion ...
— Memoir and Diary of John Yeardley, Minister of the Gospel • John Yeardley

... power of diminishing the effects of stimulating substances upon the animal system. Of this class, garden rue, or marsh-mallow, gum-arabic, and gum-tragacanth are the ...
— Cattle and Their Diseases • Robert Jennings

... that it could be heard in the centre of Paris. Around the Fort of Noisy the projectiles sank into the frozen ground to a depth of two and a half metres, and raised blocks of earth weighing 30lbs. Shells fell as far as Romainville. In the Rue de Pantin a drummer had his head carried off; his comrades buried him on the spot. In the court of Fort Noisy three men, hearing the hissing of a shell, threw themselves on the ground. It was a bad inspiration; the shell fell on the one ...
— Diary of the Besieged Resident in Paris • Henry Labouchere

... the boat which had brought them to the Louvre and thence proceeded to the Halles; and taking up Grimaud and Blaisois, they went on foot to the Rue Guenegaud. ...
— Twenty Years After • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... corner of Monsieur de Clericy's card was unknown to me, although I was passably acquainted with the Paris streets. The Rue des Palmiers was, I learnt, across the river, and, my informant added, lay between the boulevard and the Seine. This was a part of the bright city which Haussmann and Napoleon III had as yet left untouched—a quarter of quiet, gloomy streets and narrow alleys. The sun was shining on the gay river ...
— Dross • Henry Seton Merriman

... leech that sucks at body and soul. You get so the mortgage looks worse than your sins, an' you pray to be forgiven that instead of them. I know. Don't you have a mortgage put on your house, Paulina Maria Judd, or you'll rue the day. I'd—steal ...
— Jerome, A Poor Man - A Novel • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... true, he had done a very wicked and foolish action; wicked, because he must have overwhelmed those with grief whom he was bound to honour and love, and foolish, inasmuch as he was going to expose himself to inconceivable miseries and hardships, which would shortly cause him to rue the step he had taken; that he would be only welcome in foreign countries so long as he had money to spend, and when he had none, he would be repulsed as a vagabond, and would perhaps be allowed to perish of hunger. ...
— The Bible in Spain • George Borrow

... thine eyes, O sinner. Yea, and thy tongue, together with the rest of thy members, shall be tormented for sinning. And I say, I am very confident, that though this be made light of now, yet the time is coming when many poor souls will rue the day that ever they did speak with a tongue. O, will one say, that I should so disregard my tongue! O that I, when I said so and so, had before bitten off my tongue! That I had been born without a tongue! ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... on, fantastically mad, her songs set to comic airs. The great house received her in the same comic spirit. Instead of rue and rosemary she carried a rustling green Lulov—the palm-branch of the Feast of Tabernacles—and shook it piously toward every corner of the compass. At each shake the audience rolled about in spasms ...
— Ghetto Comedies • Israel Zangwill

... heavy veil, the atmosphere of a strange world into his somewhat severely furnished office. Her skirts swept his carpet with a musical swirl. She carried with her a faint, indefinable perfume of violets,—a perfume altogether peculiar, dedicated to her by a famous chemist in the Rue Royale, and supplied to no other person upon earth. Who else was there, indeed, who could have walked those few ...
— Havoc • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... will hinder this," answered Gernot, and he forbade his knights speak aught with haughtiness that might cause rue. Siegfried, too, then bethought him of ...
— The Nibelungenlied • Unknown

... in the matter of dress, one must be sinfully lavish. Really, child, I could spend three months in the Engadine for the price of one decent month at Newport; the parasols, gloves, fans, shoes, 'frillies'—enough to stock the Rue de la Paix, to say nothing of gowns—but why do I run on? Here am I with a few little simple summer things, fit enough indeed for the quiet place we shall reach for July and August, but ab-so-lute-ly impossible for Newport—so say no more ...
— The Spenders - A Tale of the Third Generation • Harry Leon Wilson

... alarm, nothing. Getting there came off all right. Everything went off so sweet and simple that I fancied I must be a defaulting Boche. We got to Lens at nightfall. I remember we passed in front of La Perche and went down the Rue du Quatorze-Juillet. I saw some of the townsfolk walking about in the streets like they do in our quarters. I didn't recognize them because of the evening, nor them me, because of the evening too, and because of the seriousness of things. ...
— Under Fire - The Story of a Squad • Henri Barbusse

... For the old love and the new! And the columbine, With its cap and bells, for folly! And the daffodil, for the hopes of youth! and the rue, For melancholy! But of all the blossoms that blow, Fair gallants all, I charge you to win, if ye may, This gentle guest, Who dreams apart, in her wimple of purple and gray, Like the blessed Virgin, with meek head bending low Upon her breast. For the orange ...
— Ponkapog Papers • Thomas Bailey Aldrich

... her closely, you will always find the strength to meet her face to face. Overshadowed by her burden of bitterness, one fails to find the balm. Concealed within her garments or held loosely in her hand, she always has her bit of consolation; rosemary in the midst of her rue, belief with the ...
— A Spinner in the Sun • Myrtle Reed

... gae hame To your ain countrie, Nor come o'er the March for me." But sairly did she rue When he thought that she spak' true And the ...
— Lady John Russell • Desmond MacCarthy and Agatha Russell

... patch of dark blue rue paints this shady grove; it has short leaves and throws out short umbels, and passes the breath of the wind and the rays of the sun right down to the end of the stalk, and at a gentle touch gives forth ...
— The Development of the Feeling for Nature in the Middle Ages and - Modern Times • Alfred Biese

... security for its safe return. Etienne Chevalier was one of the few servants of King Charles who were tolerated by King Louis. He became Chief Treasurer to Louis XI., and built a great mansion in the Rue de la Verrerie in Paris. The walls and ceilings were decorated with allegorical designs in honour of his friend Agnes Sorel, whose courage had led to the expulsion of the English invaders. The library was filled ...
— The Great Book-Collectors • Charles Isaac Elton and Mary Augusta Elton

... the news of a new revolution—'The Chamber of Deputies dissolved for ever; the liberty of the press abolished; king, ministers, court, and ambassadors flying from Paris to Vincennes; cannon planted against the city; 5,000 people killed, and the Rue de Rivoli running with blood.' No wonder such rumours stirred and overwhelmed the staunch but excitable lady. 'You will readily believe how anxious, interested, and excited I feel,' she says; and then she goes on to speak ...
— A Book of Sibyls - Miss Barbauld, Miss Edgeworth, Mrs Opie, Miss Austen • Anne Thackeray (Mrs. Richmond Ritchie)

... I received an anonymous letter, requesting me to be, at such an hour, at a certain house in the Rue———. It occurred to me as no improbable supposition that the appointment might relate to my individual circumstances, whether domestic or political, and I certainly had not at the moment any ideas of gallantry in my brain. At the hour prescribed I appeared at the place of ...
— Devereux, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... shot. Toward evening the second battalion of the 61st, to which Wilhelm belonged, received the order to advance. Over pleasure-gardens and vineyards they went, through poor people's deserted houses the four companies of skirmishers worked their way to the entrance of the Rue St. Catherine, a long, narrow street. Just at the end stood a large three-storied factory, whose front, filled with large high windows, looked like a framework of stone and iron. At every window there was a crowd of soldiers; the whole front bristled with death-dealing weapons. ...
— The Malady of the Century • Max Nordau

... let rue tell you this. If the time comes when you must lay down the fiddle and the bow, because your fingers are too stiff, and drop the ten-foot sculls, because your arms are too weak, and, after dallying awhile with eye-glasses, come at last to the undisguised reality ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... standing upon a mount holding his silver Saltire and surrounded by rays in the form of a glory. This Badge is worn from the Collar of the Order, formed of sixteen Thistles alternating with as many bunches of rue-sprigs; or, from a broad dark green Ribbon, which crosses the left shoulder. There are fine examples of these Insignia sculptured upon the Monument of MARY, Queen of Scots, in Westminster Abbey. The jewel ...
— The Handbook to English Heraldry • Charles Boutell



Words linked to "Rue" :   French Republic, unhappiness, Ruta graveolens, attrition, repent, street, regret, sadness, herb of grace, ruefulness, sorrow, remorse, wall rue, compunction, feel, Ruta, false rue anemone, goat's rue, contriteness, wall rue spleenwort, France, rue family, contrition, genus Ruta, goat rue, meadow rue, herbaceous plant, false rue, self-reproach, herb, experience, rue anemone



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