Free translatorFree translator
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Tree   Listen
noun
Tree  n.  
1.
(Bot.) Any perennial woody plant of considerable size (usually over twenty feet high) and growing with a single trunk. Note: The kind of tree referred to, in any particular case, is often indicated by a modifying word; as forest tree, fruit tree, palm tree, apple tree, pear tree, etc.
2.
Something constructed in the form of, or considered as resembling, a tree, consisting of a stem, or stock, and branches; as, a genealogical tree.
3.
A piece of timber, or something commonly made of timber; used in composition, as in axletree, boottree, chesstree, crosstree, whiffletree, and the like.
4.
A cross or gallows; as Tyburn tree. "(Jesus) whom they slew and hanged on a tree."
5.
Wood; timber. (Obs.) "In a great house ben not only vessels of gold and of silver but also of tree and of earth."
6.
(Chem.) A mass of crystals, aggregated in arborescent forms, obtained by precipitation of a metal from solution. See Lead tree, under Lead.
Tree bear (Zool.), the raccoon. (Local, U. S.)
Tree beetle (Zool.) any one of numerous species of beetles which feed on the leaves of trees and shrubs, as the May beetles, the rose beetle, the rose chafer, and the goldsmith beetle.
Tree bug (Zool.), any one of numerous species of hemipterous insects which live upon, and suck the sap of, trees and shrubs. They belong to Arma, Pentatoma, Rhaphigaster, and allied genera.
Tree cat (Zool.), the common paradoxure (Paradoxurus musang).
Tree clover (Bot.), a tall kind of melilot (Melilotus alba). See Melilot.
Tree crab (Zool.), the purse crab. See under Purse.
Tree creeper (Zool.), any one of numerous species of arboreal creepers belonging to Certhia, Climacteris, and allied genera. See Creeper, 3.
Tree cricket (Zool.), a nearly white arboreal American cricket (Ecanthus nivoeus) which is noted for its loud stridulation; called also white cricket.
Tree crow (Zool.), any one of several species of Old World crows belonging to Crypsirhina and allied genera, intermediate between the true crows and the jays. The tail is long, and the bill is curved and without a tooth.
Tree dove (Zool.) any one of several species of East Indian and Asiatic doves belonging to Macropygia and allied genera. They have long and broad tails, are chiefly arboreal in their habits, and feed mainly on fruit.
Tree duck (Zool.), any one of several species of ducks belonging to Dendrocygna and allied genera. These ducks have a long and slender neck and a long hind toe. They are arboreal in their habits, and are found in the tropical parts of America, Africa, Asia, and Australia.
Tree fern (Bot.), an arborescent fern having a straight trunk, sometimes twenty or twenty-five feet high, or even higher, and bearing a cluster of fronds at the top. Most of the existing species are tropical.
Tree fish (Zool.), a California market fish (Sebastichthys serriceps).
Tree frog. (Zool.)
(a)
Same as Tree toad.
(b)
Any one of numerous species of Old World frogs belonging to Chiromantis, Rhacophorus, and allied genera of the family Ranidae. Their toes are furnished with suckers for adhesion. The flying frog (see under Flying) is an example.
Tree goose (Zool.), the bernicle goose.
Tree hopper (Zool.), any one of numerous species of small leaping hemipterous insects which live chiefly on the branches and twigs of trees, and injure them by sucking the sap. Many of them are very odd in shape, the prothorax being often prolonged upward or forward in the form of a spine or crest.
Tree jobber (Zool.), a woodpecker. (Obs.)
Tree kangaroo. (Zool.) See Kangaroo.
Tree lark (Zool.), the tree pipit. (Prov. Eng.)
Tree lizard (Zool.), any one of a group of Old World arboreal lizards (formerly grouped as the Dendrosauria) comprising the chameleons; also applied to various lizards belonging to the families Agamidae or Iguanidae, especially those of the genus Urosaurus, such as the lined tree lizard (Urosaurus ornatus) of the southwestern U.S.
Tree lobster. (Zool.) Same as Tree crab, above.
Tree louse (Zool.), any aphid; a plant louse.
Tree moss. (Bot.)
(a)
Any moss or lichen growing on trees.
(b)
Any species of moss in the form of a miniature tree.
Tree mouse (Zool.), any one of several species of African mice of the subfamily Dendromyinae. They have long claws and habitually live in trees.
Tree nymph, a wood nymph. See Dryad.
Tree of a saddle, a saddle frame.
Tree of heaven (Bot.), an ornamental tree (Ailantus glandulosus) having long, handsome pinnate leaves, and greenish flowers of a disagreeable odor.
Tree of life (Bot.), a tree of the genus Thuja; arbor vitae.
Tree onion (Bot.), a species of garlic (Allium proliferum) which produces bulbs in place of flowers, or among its flowers.
Tree oyster (Zool.), a small American oyster (Ostrea folium) which adheres to the roots of the mangrove tree; called also raccoon oyster.
Tree pie (Zool.), any species of Asiatic birds of the genus Dendrocitta. The tree pies are allied to the magpie.
Tree pigeon (Zool.), any one of numerous species of longwinged arboreal pigeons native of Asia, Africa, and Australia, and belonging to Megaloprepia, Carpophaga, and allied genera.
Tree pipit. (Zool.) See under Pipit.
Tree porcupine (Zool.), any one of several species of Central and South American arboreal porcupines belonging to the genera Chaetomys and Sphingurus. They have an elongated and somewhat prehensile tail, only four toes on the hind feet, and a body covered with short spines mixed with bristles. One South American species (Sphingurus villosus) is called also couiy; another (Sphingurus prehensilis) is called also coendou.
Tree rat (Zool.), any one of several species of large ratlike West Indian rodents belonging to the genera Capromys and Plagiodon. They are allied to the porcupines.
Tree serpent (Zool.), a tree snake.
Tree shrike (Zool.), a bush shrike.
Tree snake (Zool.), any one of numerous species of snakes of the genus Dendrophis. They live chiefly among the branches of trees, and are not venomous.
Tree sorrel (Bot.), a kind of sorrel (Rumex Lunaria) which attains the stature of a small tree, and bears greenish flowers. It is found in the Canary Islands and Tenerife.
Tree sparrow (Zool.) any one of several species of small arboreal sparrows, especially the American tree sparrow (Spizella monticola), and the common European species (Passer montanus).
Tree swallow (Zool.), any one of several species of swallows of the genus Hylochelidon which lay their eggs in holes in dead trees. They inhabit Australia and adjacent regions. Called also martin in Australia.
Tree swift (Zool.), any one of several species of swifts of the genus Dendrochelidon which inhabit the East Indies and Southern Asia.
Tree tiger (Zool.), a leopard.
Tree toad (Zool.), any one of numerous species of amphibians belonging to Hyla and allied genera of the family Hylidae. They are related to the common frogs and toads, but have the tips of the toes expanded into suckers by means of which they cling to the bark and leaves of trees. Only one species (Hyla arborea) is found in Europe, but numerous species occur in America and Australia. The common tree toad of the Northern United States (Hyla versicolor) is noted for the facility with which it changes its colors. Called also tree frog. See also Piping frog, under Piping, and Cricket frog, under Cricket.
Tree warbler (Zool.), any one of several species of arboreal warblers belonging to Phylloscopus and allied genera.
Tree wool (Bot.), a fine fiber obtained from the leaves of pine trees.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Tree" Quotes from Famous Books



... in the open fields are nibbled off by cattle. But in that part of the park no cattle had fed in the memory of man; so that the lower limbs, drooping by their own weight, came arching to the turf. Each tree thus made a ...
— Round About a Great Estate • Richard Jefferies

... it would be cruel to prolong the agony of expectation. Mr. Lewis having occupied himself, almost exclusively, with his pencil during the whole morning, I persuaded him to accompany me to St. Loup. After dinner we set out upon our expedition. It had rained in the interim, and every tree was charged with moisture as we passed them ... their blossoms exhaling sweets of the most pungent fragrance. The road ran in a straight line from the west front of the cathedral, which, on turning round, as we saw it irradiated by partial glimpses of ...
— A Bibliographical, Antiquarian and Picturesque Tour in France and Germany, Volume One • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... time to get up," said Mrs. Squirrel, one morning. But little Bushy-Tail was having such a nice dream about a wonderful tree where all kinds of nuts grew side by side on the same branch that he did not answer. Only his eyelids quivered ever so little, so his mother ...
— Hazel Squirrel and Other Stories • Howard B. Famous

... certain knowledge, by her favourite concentrated extract or anima of quassia. She entered into the history of the negro slave named Quassi, who discovered this medical wood, which he kept a close secret till Mr. Daghlberg, a magistrate of Surinam, wormed it out of him, brought a branch of the tree to Europe, and communicated it to the great Linnaeus—when Clarence Hervey was announced by the title ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. III - Belinda • Maria Edgeworth

... I raise the present on the past, (As some perennial tree out of its roots, the present on the past,) With time and space I him dilate and fuse the immortal laws, To make himself by them ...
— Leaves of Grass • Walt Whitman

... difficulty in following her. They were soon under the very roof, in the maze of timber-work. They slipped through the buttresses, the rafters, the joists; they ran from beam to beam as they might have run from tree to ...
— The Phantom of the Opera • Gaston Leroux

... to despise any one for the plainness of his dress, and the rusticity of his manners. You may understand a little Latin, but you know not how to plough, sow grain, or reap the harvest, nor even to prune a tree. Sit down with being convinced that you have ...
— The Looking-Glass for the Mind - or Intellectual Mirror • M. Berquin

... turning toward the crowd and the lights again, when suddenly a dark form emerged from behind the tree, a pair of hands grasped her wrists in a steely grip, and a low, menacing voice hissed ...
— Dainty's Cruel Rivals - The Fatal Birthday • Mrs. Alex McVeigh Miller

... women may now glory in the work allotted to their sex. The most radical feminist writer of the day has given perfect expression to the home's demand. Husband and children, she says, have been able to count on a woman "as they could count on the fire on the hearth, the cool shade under the tree, the water in the well, the bread in the sacrament." We may go farther and say that our high emprise does not depend upon husband and children. Married or unmarried, fruitful or barren, with a vocation or without, we must make of the world a home ...
— The Unpopular Review, Volume II Number 3 • Various

... horses within reach,[7] leaving none for the militia or for General E.H. Hobson, which enabled him to gain on his pursuers, and he would then have left Hobson far out of sight but for the home guard, who obstructed the roads somewhat, and bushwhacked his men from every hedge, hill, or tree, when it could be done. But the trouble was that we could not attack him with ...
— Famous Adventures And Prison Escapes of the Civil War • Various

... flow is a cliff or steep slope varying in height from a few feet to that of a good-sized tree. Between the silt plain and the general level of its bed rises a terrace. In front of it Prince stopped and distributed the men he had reserved to search the lava bed. He gave ...
— A Man Four-Square • William MacLeod Raine

... been simple enough, and soon Anton came in sight of the hut. He did not want to come any nearer. He sat down behind an oak tree, and waited. From where he sat, he could watch the entrance to the hut, but could not himself ...
— The Children's Pilgrimage • L. T. Meade

... missionary station lately established by Mr Liddiard, and the lady was his devoted wife. It stood upon a platform of coral-stone, raised about two feet from the ground, while the roof projected a considerable distance beyond the walls, and was supported by stout posts formed of the bread-fruit tree, tightly bound to the ...
— Mary Liddiard - The Missionary's Daughter • W.H.G. Kingston

... March so high? This spring they blew a gale. As they roared around corners and through tree tops and rushed down the streets with fury they made pedestrians unsteady. But they did not disturb little Jim, who buttoned up his coat tight, drew down his hat and squared his shoulders as he went out to meet their buffets. There was that in little ...
— The Widow O'Callaghan's Boys • Gulielma Zollinger

... desired to be introduced to me, and talked to me a long time. I thought him very good-natured and a charming talker. Mrs. Bradshaw (Maria Tree) was there, looking beautiful. Our hostess's daughter, Miss F——, is very pretty, but just misses being a beauty; in that case a miss is a great deal worse than a mile. Just as the rooms were beginning to thin, and we were going away, Lord ...
— Records of a Girlhood • Frances Anne Kemble

... Blessing fall upon the pasture broad, On fruitful mead, and every corn-clad hill, And woodland rich with flowers that children love: Unnumbered be the homesteads, and the hearths: - A blessing on the women, and the men, On youth, and maiden, and the suckling babe: A blessing on the fruit-bestowing tree, And foodful river tide. Be true; be pure, Not living from below, but from above, As men that over-top the world. And raise Here, on this rock, high place of idols once, A kingly church to God. The same shall stand For aye, or, wrecked, ...
— The Legends of Saint Patrick • Aubrey de Vere

... the boat, Mrs. Creighton, here is a bridge," replied Harry, springing on the trunk of a dead tree, which nearly reached the islet she had pointed out; catching the branch of an oak on the opposite shore, he swung himself across. The flowers were soon gathered; and, after a little difficulty in reaching the dead tree, he returned to the ladies, just as they were about to ...
— Elinor Wyllys - Vol. I • Susan Fenimore Cooper

... some splendid coloured breeze, some carpet of magic pattern—came and swung Joan up to a high tree loaded with golden apples. There she swung—singing her heart out. Johnny's voice came ...
— The Cathedral • Hugh Walpole

... number of adamantine stumps. He started without experience, or with very little, but with plenty of advice from men who knew less about farming than he did. He found a soft place between two roots on one side of the first tree, made a narrow, irregular hole, and burrowed down till he reached a level where the tap-root was somewhat less than four feet in diameter, and not quite as hard as flint: then he found that he hadn't room to swing the axe, so he heaved out another ...
— While the Billy Boils • Henry Lawson

... find out was that the MSS. were the notes of ceremonies made by a man who had been initiated into a Lodge in Germany, and that the temple from which they originated was "a special temple" working on the Cabala tree like the English branch of the Order. Further, he was told that none of the "big Three" who founded the Golden Dawn in England were ...
— Secret Societies And Subversive Movements • Nesta H. Webster

... mystery to the new one. There had been a tragedy in August's family when she was a child, and the affair seemed to have cast a gloom over the lives of the entire family, for the lowering brooding cloud was on all their faces. August would take to the bush when things went wrong at home, and climb a tree and brood till she was found and coaxed home. Things, according to pa gossip, had gone wrong with her from the date of the tragedy, when she, a bright little girl, was taken—a homeless orphan—to live with a sister, and, afterwards, with an aunt-by-marriage. They treated her, 'twas said, with ...
— Over the Sliprails • Henry Lawson

... a most striking type of man, like a straight, healthy tree, most cordial in manner, with a beautiful voice that made even oaths sound like splendid oratory, a keen intelligence flavoured with a pinch of humour, and a great gift ...
— Sir Robert Hart - The Romance of a Great Career, 2nd Edition • Juliet Bredon

... and the boys went out into the garden, strolled into the small shrubbery and patch of woodland which helped to shelter the house from the western gales, and then, marvellous to relate, instead of running off to get rid of some of their pent-up vitality, they sat down upon a prostrate tree-trunk, which had been left for the purpose, and Vince began to rub his shins, bending up and down in ...
— Cormorant Crag - A Tale of the Smuggling Days • George Manville Fenn

... nodded, and again ordering a halt, passed the word for the men to sit down upon the grass and observe the strictest silence. Divesting themselves of their belts and muskets, El Tuerto and Paco now approached a lofty tree growing at a short distance from the cascade, and whose upper boughs reached to the top of the precipice, and to the astonishment of Herrera and Torres, and indeed of all who were sufficiently near to distinguish their movements, began ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 367, May 1846 • Various

... more majestic than any king's diadem, and gave its protecting shelter, each of them, to a wide domain of earth's minor growths. Underneath their branches the turf was all green and gold, for the slant sun rays came in there and gold was in the tree tops, some of the same gold; and the green shadows and the golden bands and flecks of light were all still. There was no stir of air that evening. Silence, the stillness and solitude of a woodland, were all around; the only house visible from here ...
— The End of a Coil • Susan Warner

... a beautiful spring that bubbled out of the side of a rock and broadened into a basin below; an old log cabin, long since deserted and open to the weather, and last of all, "Charlie's Oak." Half a century ago, an Exmoor boy had hanged himself on this tree. Another Exmoor boy, many years later, had carved a cross on the tree and by that sign and others learned from Exmoor boys, they finally ...
— Molly Brown's Senior Days • Nell Speed

... feet behind, or south of, Starved Rock. The earthwork follows the line of the ravines on two sides. On the east, there is an opening, or gateway, leading to the adjacent prairie. The work is very irregular in form, and shows no trace of the civilized engineer. In the stump of an oak-tree upon it, Dr. Paul counted a hundred and sixty rings of annual growth. The village of the Shawanoes (Chaouenons), on Franquelin's map, corresponds with the position of this earthwork. I am indebted to the kindness of Dr. John Paul, and Colonel D. F. Hitt, the ...
— France and England in North America, a Series of Historical Narratives, Part Third • Francis Parkman

... on their bare stems, seem coated with silver. The sparrows in the hedges twitter and fly away in restless groups at the children's approach; then they settle down not far off, only to go whirring up again, till at last they flutter into a garden and alight in an apple-tree with such force that the leaves come showering down. A magpie flies up suddenly from the path and shoots across to the large pear-tree, where some ravens are perched in silence. The magpie must have told them something, for the ravens fly up and circle round the tree; one old ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. VIII • Various

... asked the stout sportsman. He wiped his brow as he spoke, and propped himself against a tree in the field opposite his companion, feeling quite unequal to clearing the broad ditch ...
— Farewell • Honore de Balzac

... the Twins' Father and Mother named their little daughter "Take" because they hoped she would grow up to be tall and slender and strong and graceful like the bamboo tree. ...
— THE JAPANESE TWINS • Lucy Fitch Perkins

... plucks from a tree a large mango fruit, offers it to his mistress, blinking, in his cloven hoof, then droops his head and, grunting, with uplifted neck, fumbles to kneel. Bloom stoops his ...
— Ulysses • James Joyce

... went up to the men, who were resting under a large elm tree, and complimented them on their day's work. They were themselves well satisfied with it, and with one another. When men have had sixteen hours or so hard mowing in company, and none of them can say that the others have not done their fair share, they are apt to respect one another more ...
— Tom Brown at Oxford • Thomas Hughes

... ponds, and roads put into order, it would be an elegant residence for the governor of the island. Our inspection was confined to the gardens and prospects, from the house being shut up; we afterwards made a rural dinner under the shade of a banian tree, and my friend Pitot, with M. Bayard, a judge in the court of appeal, then separated from their families to conduct me onward to ...
— A Voyage to Terra Australis Volume 2 • Matthew Flinders

... a great deal more than its chief masters bargained for. Nature, as explained by science, is nothing more than a vast automaton; and man with all his ways and works is simply a part of Nature, and can, by no device of thought, be detached from or set above it. He is as absolutely automatic as a tree is, or as a flower is; and is an incapable as a tree or flower of any spiritual responsibility or significance. Here we see the real limits of science. It will explain the facts of life to us, it is true, but it will not explain the value that hitherto we have attached to them. Is ...
— Is Life Worth Living? • William Hurrell Mallock

... making his great book about birds, he had to live much in the woods. Sometimes he lived among the Indians. He once saw an Indian go into a hollow tree. There was a bear in the tree. The Indian had a knife in his hand. He fought with the bear in the tree, and ...
— Stories of Great Americans for Little Americans • Edward Eggleston

... as soon as she did. He came towards us, slashing viciously at the flowers with his riding-whip. When he was near enough to see my face he stopped, struck at his boot with the whip, and burst out laughing, so harshly and so violently that the birds flew away, startled, from the tree by ...
— The Woman in White • Wilkie Collins

... place possest, Whose fortunes good with his great acts agree, By his Italian sire, fro the house of Est, Well could he bring his noble pedigree, A German born with rich possessions blest, A worthy branch sprung from the Guelphian tree. 'Twixt Rhene and Danubie the land contained He ruled, where Swaves and Rhetians ...
— Jerusalem Delivered • Torquato Tasso

... on a bright moonlight night, comes reeling through the little white gate, and stumbling over the graves. He shouts and he sings, and is presently followed by others like unto himself, or worse. So, they all laugh at the dark solemn head of the yew tree, and throw stones up at the place where the moon ...
— The International Weekly Miscellany, Volume I. No. 8 - Of Literature, Art, and Science, August 19, 1850 • Various

... went out to where she was. As I approached what looked like a mere bundle of linen thrown against the gnarled trunk of the tree, I recognized the large, dark eyes, the tattooed stars, and the long, regular features of that semi-wild girl who had so captivated my senses. As I advanced towards her, I felt inclined to strike her, to make her suffer pain, and to have my revenge, and so I ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume IV (of 8) • Guy de Maupassant

... tons was there found; a ship supposed of Queene Elizabeth's time, and well wrought, with a great deal of stone shot in her of eighteen inches diameter, which was shot then in use: and afterwards meeting with Captain Perriman and Mr. Castle at Half-way Tree, they tell me of stone-shot of thirty-six inches diameter, which they ...
— The Diary of Samuel Pepys • Samuel Pepys

... of every table in the room. I appear on Sunday nights at St. James' coffee house, and sometimes join the little committee of politics in the inner room as one who comes there to hear and improve. My face is likewise very well known at the Grecian, the Cocoa Tree, and in the theatres both of Drury Lane and the Hay Market. I have been taken for a merchant upon the Exchange for above these ten years, and sometimes pass for a Jew in the assembly of stock jobbers at Jonathan's; in short, wherever I see a cluster of people, ...
— All About Coffee • William H. Ukers

... on and find a thick tree; then we can shelter till we see how it turns out. We are not far from ...
— The Trespasser • D.H. Lawrence

... such a veil of hypocrisy as that with which I sometimes think Denbigh must deceive even himself. His case is an extraordinary exception to a very sacred rule—'that the tree is known by its fruits,'" replied her aunt. "There is no safer way of judging of character that one's opportunities will not admit of more closely investigating, than by examining into and duly appreciating early impressions. The man or ...
— Precaution • James Fenimore Cooper

... "family" of unicellular beings from one period of conjugation to the next, we see that a great number of single individuals, that is, single cells, have proceeded from the double individual formed by conjugation. These may all continue to increase by splitting in two, and then the family tree is composed of dichotomously branching lines; or they may resolve themselves into numerous spores, and then the family tree exhibits a number of branches springing from ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 810, July 11, 1891 • Various

... correctly ailantus, from ailanto, an Amboyna word probably meaning "Tree of the Gods,'' or "Tree of Heaven''), a genus of trees belonging to the natural order Simarubaceae. The best known species, A. glandulosa, Chinese sumach or tree of heaven, is a handsome, quick-growing tree with spreading branches and large compound leaves, resembling those ...
— Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia

... not fight for bond or plight, Nor yet for golden fee; But for the sake of our blessed Lord, That died Upon the tree. ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. CCCXLV. July, 1844. Vol. LVI. • Various

... made a fine parade of their small, exquisite scarlet flowers, and pushed them upwards into the sparkling sunlight through the veils of white starry blossoms of the jessamine that climbed over and trailed from every tree ...
— Six Women • Victoria Cross

... him with the Holy Spirit and with power: who went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed of the devil; for God was with him. 39 And we are witnesses of all things which he did both in the country of the Jews, and in Jerusalem; whom also they slew, hanging him on a tree. 40 Him God raised up the third day, and gave him to be made manifest, 41 not to all the people, but unto witnesses that were chosen before of God, even to us, who ate and drank with him after he rose from the dead. 42 ...
— Epistle Sermons, Vol. II - Epiphany, Easter and Pentecost • Martin Luther

... there, are gelves, of which some mention hath been made already; these are the more convenient, because they will not split if thrown upon banks or against rocks. These gelves have given occasion to the report that out of the cocoa-tree alone a ship may be built, fitted out with masts, sails, and cordage, and victualled with bread, water, wine, sugar, vinegar, and oil. All this indeed cannot be done out of one tree, but may out of several of the same kind. They saw the trunk into planks, and sew them together with thread which ...
— A Voyage to Abyssinia • Jerome Lobo

... varieties of beings, have laid open such new worlds in time and space, have grappled, not unsuccessfully, with such complex problems, that the eyes of Vesalius [33] and of Harvey [34] might be dazzled by the sight of the tree that has grown out of their grain of ...
— Autobiography and Selected Essays • Thomas Henry Huxley

... exclaimed Ned. "And I think if we could get head or tail of those burned papers we'd find that there was some correspondence there between the man I saw up the tree and ...
— Tom Swift and his War Tank - or, Doing his Bit for Uncle Sam • Victor Appleton

... claim was soon worked out, and as the river had fallen some we tried the bar, but we could only make four or five dollars a day, and the gold was very fine and hard to save. We bought a hind quarter of an elk and hung it up in a tree and it kept fresh till all ...
— Death Valley in '49 • William Lewis Manly

... make a lumber saw—slender, rapierlike revolving tool with which a man stabbed a tree and cut outward with the speed of a knife cutting hot butter. And one could mount it so—and cut out planks and beams for ...
— The Pirates of Ersatz • Murray Leinster

... "valley of Eschol," from whence the spies sent out by Moses carried the great cluster of grapes. (Num. 13:23.) Before entering Hebron we turned aside and went up to Abraham's Oak, a very old tree, but not old enough for Abraham to have enjoyed its shade almost four thousand years ago. The trunk is thirty-two feet in circumference, but the tree is not tall like the American oaks. It is now in a dying condition, ...
— A Trip Abroad • Don Carlos Janes

... by Pythagoras as an allegory was accepted literally, 398-m. Transmigration of souls, the early Christians held the doctrine of the, 399-l. Transposition of the letters of a word common amongst Talmudists, 698-m. Transposition used to conceal secret meanings, 699-u. Tree of Knowledge became the Tree of Death, 844-u. Tree of Life represented by the branch of Acacia, 786-l. Tree under which Atys died was a pins and held sacred to him, 423-l. Triad includes in itself the properties of ...
— Morals and Dogma of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry • Albert Pike

... and taller and overtopping them. In this case, natural selection would tend to add to the stature of the plant, to whatever order it belonged, and thus first convert it into a bush and then into a tree. ...
— On the Origin of Species - 6th Edition • Charles Darwin

... illuminating power, mingled suddenly with the blue and spectral beams of Deimos and the land thus visited by the complimentary flood of light from these twin luminaries seemed suddenly dipped in silver. A beautiful white light, most unreal, as you mortals might say, fell on tree and water, cliff, hill, and villages. The effect was not unlike that instant in photography when a developing plate shows the outlines of its objects in dazzling silver before the half tints are added, and the image ...
— The Certainty of a Future Life in Mars • L. P. Gratacap

... on the morning that the Esquimer thought to escape scrubbing, even at the peril of his life, by getting up on to the swing-shelf —how, no man ever knew. But there he sat in terror, like a very young monkey in a wind-rocked tree, hardly daring to breathe, his arms clasped tight round the demijohn; but having Mac to deal with, the end of it was that he always got washed, and equally always he seemed to register a vow that, s'help him, Heaven! it should ...
— The Magnetic North • Elizabeth Robins (C. E. Raimond)

... fifty or a hundred miles to the sparsely settled election districts of the interior. As they passed along, the more scrupulous went through the empty form of an imaginary settlement, by nailing a card to a tree, driving a stake into the ground, or inscribing their names in a claim register, prepared in haste by the invading party. The indifferent satisfied themselves with mere mental resolves to become settlers. The utterly reckless silenced all ...
— Abraham Lincoln: A History V1 • John G. Nicolay and John Hay

... Sawyers. We may ask, where are they? and not Echo, but the Archbishop of Canterbury, must answer where—for he has most sacerdotally put down all the jollity there, by pulling down the house, and has built up a large wharf, where once stood a very pretty tree-besprinkled walk, leading to the said Jolly Sawyers. Cut-throat Lane is no more; yet, though it bore a villainous name, it was very pretty to walk through; and its many turnstiles were as so many godsends to the little boys, as they enjoyed on them, gratis, some blithe rides, that they ...
— Rattlin the Reefer • Edward Howard

... little fiddle, let it cost me what it would. But what was I to make a fiddle out of? Of cedar wood, of course. But it's easy to talk of cedar wood. How was I to come by it when, as everybody knows, the cedar tree grows only in Palestine? But what does the Lord do for me? He goes and puts a certain thought in my head. In our house there was an old sofa. This sofa was left us, as a legacy, by our grandfather "Reb" Anshel. And my ...
— Jewish Children • Sholem Naumovich Rabinovich

... Bruttium, that a foal had been born with five feet, and three chickens with three feet each. Afterwards a letter was brought from Macedonia, from Publius Sulpicius, proconsul, in which, among other matters, it was mentioned, that a laurel tree had sprung up on the poop of a ship of war. On occasion of the former prodigies, the senate had voted, that the consuls should offer sacrifices with the greater victims to such gods as they thought proper. On account of the last prodigy, alone, the aruspices were called before the senate, ...
— History of Rome, Vol III • Titus Livius

... glittering ice. The sight was so dazzling that his eyes were almost blinded, but it was wonderfully beautiful, too. The frozen surface of the lake threw back the light in myriads of golden sheaves, and every tree, down to the last twig, gleamed in ...
— The Forest Runners - A Story of the Great War Trail in Early Kentucky • Joseph A. Altsheler

... at the same time I am angry with myself for not appreciating the exclusiveness of her affection better. I am actually beginning to think that this extravagant sentiment is fatal to her. I look upon it in her heart as I look upon the great tree in my garden, which interferes with the growth of everything around it: fond as I am of that tree, I consider it something of ...
— The Choice of Life • Georgette Leblanc

... Factory of Messrs. Martin Mahony Brothers, through which visitors may be shown when convenient to the courteous proprietors. The "Rock Close," which is at the foot of the Castle at the southern side, is one beautiful jungle of foliage, in which myrtle, ivy, and arbutus intertwine with the rowan tree and the silver hazel. ...
— The Sunny Side of Ireland - How to see it by the Great Southern and Western Railway • John O'Mahony and R. Lloyd Praeger

... hurt any body, but fly away from you, unless you pursue and set upon them; but wolves do much mischief. Mr. Harrington told us how they do to get so much honey as they send abroad. They make hollow a great fir-tree, leaving only a small slitt down straight in one place, and this they close up again, only leave a little hole, and there the bees go in and fill the bodys of those trees as full of wax and honey as they can hold; and the inhabitants ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... even so administered, were sufficient, to others (and often also to the same who had suffered as I have stated) they applied, instead of rattan and bamboo, whips made of the branches of the bale tree,—a tree full of sharp and strong thorns, which tear the skin and lacerate the flesh far worse than ordinary scourges. For others, exploring with a searching and inquisitive malice, stimulated by an insatiate ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. X. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... drooped more and more under its tree of horns, and the shambling trot grew weak and weaker. He took to standing for long periods, with nose to the ground and dejected ears dropped limply; and Buck found more time in which to get water for himself and in which to rest. At such moments, panting with red ...
— The Call of the Wild • Jack London

... seminaries. I learned the Catechism, and heard lectures upon the Thirty-nine Articles. I never found that the teaching had ever any particular effect upon my mind. As I grew up, the obsolete exuviae of doctrine dropped off my mind like dead leaves from a tree. They could not get any vital hold in an atmosphere of tolerable enlightenment. Why should we fear the attempt to instil these fragments of decayed formulae into the minds of children of tender age? Might we not be certain that they would vanish ...
— Social Rights and Duties, Volume I (of 2) - Addresses to Ethical Societies • Sir Leslie Stephen

... of doubtful origin, pronounced b[)a]s) is the fibrous bark of the lime tree, used in gardening for tying up plants, or to make mats, soft plaited baskets, &c. Basswood is the American lime-tree, Tilia Americana; white basswood ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 3 - "Banks" to "Bassoon" • Various

... a young cottonwood tree in full leaf and a scaly, red-barked cedar, clothes that had been washed were flapping lazily in the little breeze. Marie stopped and looked at them. A man's shirt and drawers, two towels gray for want of bluing, a little shirt and a nightgown ...
— Cabin Fever • B. M. Bower

... the town of Hastings in Sussex, the English came in sight of their foes. The Normans lay encamped upon the plain, while Harold posted his army on a hill, with a little wood behind, and an old mossy apple-tree a ...
— Stories from English History • Hilda T. Skae

... narrow red stripe along the top and the bottom edges; centered is a large white disk bearing the coat of arms; the coat of arms features a shield flanked by two workers in front of a mahogany tree with the related motto SUB UMBRA FLOREO (I Flourish in the Shade) on a scroll at the bottom, all ...
— The 2003 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... meadow where our birds are there is scarcely a tree in sight to tangle the singing in. It is a meadow with miles of sunlight in it. It seems like a kind of world-melody to walk in the height of noon there—infinite grass, infinite sky, gusts of bobolinks' voices—it's as if the air that drifted down made music of itself; and the song ...
— The Lost Art of Reading • Gerald Stanley Lee

... however, at times, and when it rushed over her in its fulness, it shook her as the wind shakes the leaf on a tree—a sense of indignation, of anger, or resentment. Against whom? Against all. Against Rudyard, against Ian Stafford; but most of all, a thousand times most against a dead man, who had been swept out of life, leaving behind a memory which ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... as might be made by the clash of armour against a tree or by an armed man falling. I have listened attentively since, but have ...
— Won by the Sword - A Story of the Thirty Years' War • G.A. Henty

... the Tartars differ from the Turkes: because the Turkes fasten their garments to their bodies on the left side: but the Tartars alwaies on the right side. They haue also an ornament for their heads which they call Botta, being made of the barke of a tree, or of some such other lighter matter as they can find, which by reason of the thicknes and roundnes therof cannot be holden but in both hands together: and it hath a square sharp spire rising from the top therof, being more then a cubite in length, and fashioned like vnto a pinacle. The said Botta ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries - Vol. II • Richard Hakluyt

... and wild fruits. I thought (and yet I may be mistaken) that my people were very happy in those days, at least I was as happy myself as a lark, or as the brown thrush that sat daily on the uppermost branches of the stubby growth of a basswood tree which stood near by upon the hill where we often played under its shade, lodging our little arrows among the thick branches of the tree and then shooting them ...
— History of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan • Andrew J. Blackbird

... that the act, sooner or later, did not recoil on the offending party, through that mysterious principle of right which is implanted in the nature of things, bringing forth its own results as the seed produces its grain, and the tree its fruits; a supervision of holiness that it is usual to term (and rightly enough, when we remember who created principles) the providence of God. Let that people dread the future, who, in their collective capacity, systematically encourage injustice of any sort; since their own eventual ...
— The Wing-and-Wing - Le Feu-Follet • J. Fenimore Cooper

... left the forest and entered the plain. I ordered my tent erected under a very leafy plane tree, and had a great fire made before it, with a pile of wood, which was the only protection we could employ against the ferocious beasts whose howls continued to reach us from all directions. In the forest my dog had pressed himself against me, with his tail between his legs; ...
— The Unknown Life of Jesus Christ - The Original Text of Nicolas Notovitch's 1887 Discovery • Nicolas Notovitch

... that Pan himself sometimes brought home a shepherd's stray lamb. It was not strange, if one broke the branches of a tree, that some fair life within wept at the hurt. Even now, the Earth is glad with us in springtime, and we grieve for her when the leaves go. But in the old days there was a closer union, clearer speech ...
— Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew • Josephine Preston Peabody

... in the same mood. "Say," he added, pursing his lips to whistle, as he looked at the rose tree, "did Tuesday's ...
— Sisters • Kathleen Norris

... him," replied Smithers; "take him into the bush, so that his voice cannot be heard at the house, and tie him up to a tree; give him a taste of the stock-whip, and send him home to his master, with a request that if he takes a fancy to the brutes, he either keeps them on his run, or teaches them to exhibit better propensities when they ...
— Fern Vale (Volume 1) - or the Queensland Squatter • Colin Munro

... the entrance to a cave, pegged out on his back, and bound by the tough creepers to the stakes driven into the ground. Up to the mouth of the cave grew huge tree-ferns, cattails, cycads, and such growths as existed in earlier ages in the warm, moist ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science, May, 1930 • Various

... deference to his authorities, he yet exercised many a choice with regard to matters indifferent or undefinable. Thus, for instance, he borrows from the Talmud the notion that Satan first learned the existence of a prohibited tree from overhearing a conversation between Adam and Eve. He was surely conscious of what he was doing, and would have been not ill-pleased to learn that the Universe, as he conceived of it, has since been called by his name. ...
— Milton • Sir Walter Alexander Raleigh

... his chamber, smiled at his thoughts, which flowed with ready optimism. He had been a fool to give way so soon, perhaps. The season was not yet; the fruit was not ripe enough for plucking; still, what should it signify that he had given the tree a slight premonitory shake? A little premature, perhaps, but it would predispose the fruit to fall. He bethought him of her never-varying kindness to him, her fond gentleness, and he lacked the wit to see that this was no more than the natural sweetness that flowed from her ...
— Love-at-Arms • Raphael Sabatini

... lady with a scream; in rushed her nurse and made a dash at Tom. But out of the window went he and down a tree and away through the garden and the park into the wood beyond, with the gardener, the groom, the dairymaid, Grimes, the steward, the keeper, Sir John, and the ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Volume V. • Arthur Mee and J.A. Hammerton, Eds.

... be stripped when the tree is in full leaf and dried in the shade. The bark of the roots should be taken in the fall, when ...
— Mother's Remedies - Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remedies from Mothers - of the United States and Canada • T. J. Ritter

... that on the west coast of Africa," the mate replied. "I was there two years and got to know, I think, all there was to know with regard to steering a boat in a surf; climbing a cocoa-nut tree is easy work in comparison. Fetch the head-rope of ...
— With Cochrane the Dauntless • George Alfred Henty

... me to be quite faultless. She would say: "I want you to be perfect. Do you hear, child? Perfect." One day she thought I had told a lie. There were three cows which used to graze on some land in the middle of which was a great big chestnut tree. The white cow was wicked, and we were afraid of it, because it had knocked a little girl down once. That day I saw the two red cows, and just under the chestnut tree I saw a big black cow. I said ...
— Marie Claire • Marguerite Audoux

... know is dead, but there are others of the same name; this lady is of my family. Indeed, her house, though noble in itself, recognises the representative of mine as its head, and I am too bon prince not to acknowledge and serve any one who branches out of my own tree.'" ...
— The Parisians, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... witnesses, say his poor afflicted wife and some intelligent self-made Philistine. Perhaps it might run like this: "I, A. B., do hereby promise that I will never buy a classical book in any tongue, or any book in a rare edition; that I will never spend money on books in tree-calf or tooled morocco; that I shall never enter a real old bookshop, but should it be necessary shall purchase my books at a dry goods store, and there shall never buy anything but the cheapest religious ...
— Books and Bookmen • Ian Maclaren

... everything. Yet we could not very well move before knowing whither the outlaw crew had gone. That they made for Florida was, of course, self-evident, but where upon that vast stretch of coast? Would they entrench and wait? Were they even now watching with binoculars from a pine tree top to discover our next move, or had they set out at once for the security of the Everglades, the prairies, or the forests? Any of those trackless vastnesses to the eastward might hide a battalion of men for ...
— Wings of the Wind • Credo Harris

... successes to the Germans in the Argonne forest, where throughout the month the most savage fighting was going on in thick underbrush and from tree tops. ...
— The Story of the Great War, Volume III (of 12) - The War Begins, Invasion of Belgium, Battle of the Marne • Francis J. Reynolds, Allen L. Churchill, and Francis Trevelyan

... replied Martivalle; "this invention may be likened to a young tree, which is now newly planted, but shall, in succeeding generations, bear fruit as fatal, yet as precious, as that of the Garden of Eden; the knowledge, namely, of good ...
— Quentin Durward • Sir Walter Scott

... her foot to keep herself in motion; and as she swung she bit a strand of her hair and knitted her brows. And Martin amused himself watching her. And presently as she swung she plucked a leaf from the apple-tree and looked at it, and let it go. And then she snapped off a twig, and flung it after the leaf. And next she caught at an apple, and ...
— Martin Pippin in the Apple Orchard • Eleanor Farjeon

... condescend to explanation. Alexander Dumas, Senior, once wrote a book on Russia, which is a fruitful source of hilarity in that country yet, and a fair sample of such performances. To quote but one illustration,—he described halting to rest under the shade of a great kliukva tree. The kliukva is the tiny Russian cranberry, and grows accordingly. Another French author quite recently contributed an item of information which Russians have adopted as a characteristic bit of ignorance ...
— Russian Rambles • Isabel F. Hapgood

... leave that wood, though, without saying something about it, for just there the trees grew very curiously. Of course you know what an oak-tree is, and how it grows up tall and rugged and strong, but our oak-trees didn't grow like that. You've seen horses out in a field on a stormy day, I suppose, when the wind blows, and the rain beats. If they ...
— Devon Boys - A Tale of the North Shore • George Manville Fenn

... playing with her dolls under the Maple tree in the garden. It was the first warm day of spring, and the little girl was glad to be out of doors again, and to rock her babies to sleep on one ...
— Buttercup Gold and Other Stories • Ellen Robena Field

... white, and black, uniform but producing manifold offspring. There is one unborn male being who loves her and lies by her; there is another who leaves her after he has enjoyed her' (Svet. Up. IV, 5). 'On the same tree man, immersed, bewildered, grieves on account of his impotence; but when he sees the other Lord contented and knows his glory, then his grief passes away' (Svet. Up. IV, 9).—Smriti expresses itself similarly.—'Thus eightfold is my nature ...
— The Vedanta-Sutras with the Commentary by Ramanuja - Sacred Books of the East, Volume 48 • Trans. George Thibaut

... the speaker sounded clearly through the hawthorn tree. The young man and the young girl who sat together on the low tombstone looked at each other. They had heard the voices of the two children talking, but had not noticed what they said; it was the sentiment, not the sound, which roused ...
— The Man • Bram Stoker

... in a wooded field in Etruria. To the right is seen CATILINE's tent and close by it an old oak tree. A camp fire is burning outside the tent; similar fires are to be seen among the trees in the background. It is night. At intervals the moon breaks through ...
— Early Plays - Catiline, The Warrior's Barrow, Olaf Liljekrans • Henrik Ibsen

... Some place on the whole At the top of the tree for his diction; But his style, I opine, Is a little too fine For the ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, Oct. 3, 1917 • Various

... naturally afraid to do, but at length one fellow took heart and began by making a speech, which lasted for full fifteen minutes. As none of the sailors understood a word of it, they were not much enlightened; but the savage, who held a branch of the plantain-tree in his hand during his oration, concluded by casting this branch into the sea. This was meant as a sign of friendship, for soon after, a number of similar branches were thrown on the ship's deck, and then a few of ...
— The Cannibal Islands - Captain Cook's Adventure in the South Seas • R.M. Ballantyne

... portion still remained heathen, and these were very hostile. As was later discovered, while the good priest was reading his breviary in his office, some of these hostile Indians entered, and most cruelly murdered him, then taking his body into the mission orchard placed it against a capulin tree (a tree much resembling the cherry tree in fruit and form). On thus discovering the corpse the other Fathers immediately sent a message to the surgeon of the Royal Presidio of Monterey, who at the time was Don Manuel Quixano (step-father of the writer's great grandmother). ...
— Chimes of Mission Bells • Maria Antonia Field

... he said to her one day as they were taking a walk through the country. An old tree in the distance that had been struck by lightning ...
— The Goose Man • Jacob Wassermann

... could give a traveller juster cause to halt in sign of reverence; no altar crowned with flowers, no grotto shadowed with foliage,[35] no oak bedecked with horns, no beech garlanded with the skins of beasts, no mound whose engirdling hedge proclaims its sanctity, no tree-trunk hewn into the semblance of a god, no turf still wet with libations, no stone astream with precious unguents. For these are but small things, and though there be a few that seek them out and do them worship, the majority note them not ...
— The Apologia and Florida of Apuleius of Madaura • Lucius Apuleius

... and three merry men, and three merry men be we, I in the wood and thou on the ground, And Jack sleeps in the tree.] ...
— Shakespeare and Music - With Illustrations from the Music of the 16th and 17th centuries • Edward W. Naylor

... Egypt and her neighbour Araby: And why not say as soon the "generous man?" If race be aught, it is in qualities More than in years; and mine, which is as old As yours, is better in its product, nay— Look not so stern—but get you back, and pore Upon your genealogic tree's most green 300 Of leaves and most mature of fruits, and there Blush to find ancestors, who would have blushed For such a ...
— The Works of Lord Byron - Poetry, Volume V. • Lord Byron



Words linked to "Tree" :   salt tree, love tree, Piscidia erythrina, bottle-tree, wild mango tree, tree-worship, Leucaena glauca, Christmas bush, carambola tree, lemonwood, kitul tree, Duke of Argyll's tea tree, cinchona tree, basswood, sissu, tree poppy, peach tree, Castanopsis chrysophylla, rubber tree, silver tree, Pterocarpus indicus, capulin tree, Brachystegia speciformis, azedarach, chocolate tree, cockspur, sassafras tree, timber tree, turreae, fever tree, Pterocarpus angolensis, Elaeocarpus grandis, tree farming, Orites excelsa, plant, stump, balata, Caesalpinia bonducella, kingwood, Calophyllum calaba, devilwood, frijolillo, mango tree, sapodilla tree, tree surgeon, coral bean, hickory tree, set, Pterocarpus marsupium, red silk-cotton tree, Vangueria madagascariensis, kitembilla, bean tree, birch, Ruptiliocarpon caracolito, tangerine tree, stretch, umbrella tree, staff tree, langsat, tree wallaby, Melia Azadirachta, Chinese parasol tree, shingle tree, dragon tree, cotton-seed tree, Bombax malabarica, ketembilla tree, almond tree, tulipwood tree, Kirkia wilmsii, African walnut, rood-tree, grass tree, cherimoya tree, California bay tree, Pisonia aculeata, olive-tree agaric, tipu tree, black cherry tree, Pomaderris apetala, breadfruit tree, cembra nut tree, Schinus terebinthifolius, damson plum tree, gutta-percha tree, calabash, negro pepper, fire tree, rose chestnut, bay tree, Brisbane quandong, head, blue fig, bird cherry tree, cassia-bark tree, gallows tree, Adenanthera pavonina, cry-baby tree, pulasan tree, princewood, Japanese varnish tree, traveller's tree, Japanese pagoda tree, Chinese lacquer tree, Holarrhena pubescens, jackfruit tree, Japanese tree lilac, Brazilian potato tree, maneuver, Hydnocarpus kurzii, woods, monkey-bread tree, Schinus chichita, tree trunk, African sandalwood, opepe, cream-of-tartar tree, burl, traveler's tree, sissoo, cabbage-bark tree, poon, Tectona grandis, red sanders, banian tree, Panama tree, larch tree, black tree fern, Sophora japonica, tree kangaroo, coffee, trunk, cranberry tree, tree lizard, Sabinea carinalis, Avicennia officinalis, locust tree, pen-tailed tree shrew, shittah tree, sandalwood tree, sycamore, Spanish lime tree, albizzia, kingwood tree, wild orange, Melia azedarach, role player, Ceylon gooseberry, apple tree, Poncirus trifoliata, iron tree, huamachil, palm, birch tree, bullock's heart tree, white popinac, nutmeg tree, direct, simal, lemon-wood tree, Taraktogenos kurzii, fish fuddle, gymnospermous tree, Hoheria populnea, orchid tree, common spindle tree, tree cricket, aalii, ribbonwood, divi-divi, true sandalwood, pride of Bolivia, Dalbergia cearensis, silk wood, Myroxylon toluiferum, firewheel tree, mammee tree, Torrey tree, tree shrew, black mangrove, butternut tree, flamboyant tree, Leucaena leucocephala, big-tree plum, nakedwood, elephant tree, dhawa, God tree, Sophora tetraptera, Virgilia capensis, incense tree, point, evergreen beech, iron-tree, millettia, track, medlar, orange tree, black walnut tree, strawberry tree, sweet gum tree, temple orange tree, Pimenta acris, Nauclea diderrichii, Siberian pea tree, sweetsop tree, hazel, wild plum tree, kiaat, arishth, channelize, fig tree, frijolito, shaving-brush tree, chaulmugra, zebrawood, go after, Spanish tamarind, pecan tree, anchovy pear tree, Plagianthus betulinus, chase, bole, Judas tree, pagoda tree, pipal tree, duramen, msasa, olive tree, arere, paradise tree, coat tree, pink shower tree, Calophyllum candidissimum, pandanus, chokecherry tree, lancewood, silver-bell tree, andelmin, toothbrush tree, Azadirachta indica, brazil-nut tree, cucumber tree, rowan tree, pepper tree, Inga laurina, chinaberry, Lysiloma latisiliqua, tolu balsam tree, staff-tree family, alder tree, flame tree, oak chestnut, pernambuco wood, coral-wood, ash, myrtaceous tree, pine tree, bunya bunya tree, casuarina, granadilla tree, soapberry, Sesbania grandiflora, mammee, cocobolo, coralwood, walnut tree, tung-oil tree, potato tree, pond-apple tree, plane figure, albizia, silkwood, shoetree, cork tree, gum tree, thespian, silk tree, siris tree, linden tree, sapwood, hackberry, zebrawood tree, conessi, chase after, oak, thatch tree, erythrina, Lansium domesticum, kitambilla, Acrocarpus fraxinifolius, tree hugger, rain tree, marble-wood, Sophora secundiflora, nitta tree, spindleberry tree, white silk-cotton tree, limb, Burma padauk, plumcot tree, Diospyros kurzii, earleaved umbrella tree, Conocarpus erectus, Piscidia piscipula, citrus tree, calabura, kurchi, coral tree, groundsel tree, ebony, golden chinkapin, mescal bean, papaw tree, red saunders, sisham, toothache tree, calaba, elongate, Montezuma, dita, tanbark oak, manoeuver, tamarind tree, yellow mombin tree, Pongamia glabra, sapling, Chinese angelica tree, break-axe, devil tree, Stenocarpus sinuatus, Parkinsonia florida, Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree, necklace tree, gum



Copyright © 2021 Free Translator.org